Illustration showing how yeast is used to study histone modifications
Infographic: A Yeast Model for Studying Histone Modifications
The methodology involves modifying histones and displaying them on the cell surface for analysis.
Infographic: A Yeast Model for Studying Histone Modifications
Infographic: A Yeast Model for Studying Histone Modifications

The methodology involves modifying histones and displaying them on the cell surface for analysis.

The methodology involves modifying histones and displaying them on the cell surface for analysis.

ABOVE: © nanoclustering.com
horizontal gene transfer, genetics & genomics
Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast, 3D illustration. Microscopic fungi, baker's or brewer's yeast, are used as probiotics to restore normal flora of intestine
Yeast “Mini Labs” Help Researchers Probe Histone Modifications
Amanda Heidt | Sep 1, 2021
By harnessing a unique property of yeast, scientists can synthesize histones and the enzymes that modify these proteins, which spool DNA and influence gene expression.
Immunofluorescence image of human tenocytes (cell nuclei in blue, actin in red) with PIEZO1 protein labeled in green (Scale bar: 20 ?m)
Mechanosensory Protein Helps Tendons Stiffen After Exercise
Catherine Offord | Sep 1, 2021
Researchers identify a role for PIEZO1 in tendon adaptation, and show that people with certain versions of the Piezo1 gene tend to be better jumpers.
Five morphs of Poecilia parae—from top: melanzona yellow, melanzona blue, melanzona red, parae, immaculata—and a female (bottom) of the same species
Fish Species’ Y Chromosomes Diverged Even Without Recombination
Catherine Offord | Sep 1, 2021
Researchers discover surprisingly high levels of genetic diversity among the colorful male morphs of a freshwater fish.
Red blood vessels that decrease in diameter as they radiate outward are pictured on a pink and white surface
Antisense Oligonucleotides Cross Rodents’ Blood-Brain Barrier
Abby Olena | Aug 18, 2021
RNA-DNA complexes that were modified with cholesterol made it into the brains of rats and mice, where they knocked down target genes.
3 by 5 grid of black and white photos of indigenous Filipino portraits
Indigenous Filipino Group Has Highest Known Denisovan Ancestry
Annie Melchor | Aug 13, 2021
Researchers found the relatively high proportion of DNA from a hominin cousin—nearly 5 percent—when they scanned more than 1,000 genomes from 118 distinct ethnic groups.
An artistic rendering of blue neurons against a white background
Participant’s Diagnosis Halts Gene Therapy Clinical Trial
Amanda Heidt | Aug 12, 2021
The FDA pauses the research program on a lentivirus-based treatment for a rare neurological condition after a patient developed a bone marrow disorder that could presage leukemia.
One hand holds a white envelope with a blue and red striped border, while a second hand places a clear sheet of plastic inside with small squares of paper on it
Freeze-Dried Mouse Sperm Sent by Postcard Produces Baby Mice
Amanda Heidt | Aug 5, 2021
Rather than relying on samples that need to be shipped in glass vials and on ice, researchers have developed a new method that allows mouse sperm to be sent easily at room temperature using standard mail delivery.
A black mouse runs on a yellow and green spinning wheel against a blue background
Exercising During Pregnancy Protects Mouse Offspring
Jack J. Lee | Aug 1, 2021
Obese mice that exercised while pregnant gave birth to pups that grew up free of the metabolic issues present in the adult young of sedentary obese mothers—possibly by staving off epigenetic changes to a key metabolic gene.
A microscopy image of several endometrial stromal fibroblasts
Gene Offers Clue to How Human Labor Starts
Christie Wilcox | Aug 1, 2021
Genes associated with preterm birth and protecting the fetus from the mother’s immune system appear to be regulated by HAND2.
close up photograph of brown and yellow caterpillar on a strawberry
Genes Shared With Viruses Protect Caterpillars from Parasitic Wasps
Annie Melchor | Jul 30, 2021
A newly identified gene family named “parasitoid killing factor” is found in both insect-infecting viruses and their hosts, although researchers can’t yet tell where they originated.
photo of marshy wetland in california at sunset
Researchers Find DNA “Borgs” in Methane-Chomping Archaea
Annie Melchor | Jul 20, 2021
Massive extrachromosomal elements named after the hive-minded cyborg villains in Star Trek may be the first of their kind.
a purple betta with white fins in a tank
My Daughter’s First Pet—the Next Big Model Organism?
Christie Wilcox | Jul 15, 2021
Bettas were likely the first fish welcomed into human homes. Now, scientists are welcoming them into the lab to learn how genes dictate their appearance and behavior.
Giving Sweat the Respect It Deserves
Sarah Everts | Jul 13, 2021
Not only is the humble fluid a boon for keeping humans cool, it also contains a wealth of biological information.
the molecular structure of interferon-alpha
Lots of Rapid Evolution in Interferon-Stimulated Genes: Study
Christie Wilcox | Jul 1, 2021
A comparison of interferon-related genes across 20 primate genomes reveals differences in the speed at which they evolve and new targets for antiviral discovery efforts.
More Images
An artist's depiction of a new species of Homo, H. longi
“Dragon Man” May Replace Neanderthal as Our Closest Relative
Amanda Heidt | Jun 25, 2021
A massive, well-preserved skull discovered in China in the 1930s belongs to a new species called Homo longi, researchers report, but experts remain skeptical about the evidence.
A vial containing a red blood sample is balanced on its end on a table or desk by someone wearing a blue medical glove on their right hand
New Evidence Shows COVID-19 Was in US Weeks Before Thought
Abby Olena | Jun 17, 2021
Some of the blood specimens collected in the United States for the NIH’s All of Us research program starting on January 2, 2020, have antibodies against SARS-CoV-2.
A tasmanian devil with its nose in the air
Deadly Facial Tumors Spur Tasmanian Devil Evolution: Study
Christie Wilcox | Jun 16, 2021
The largest study to date of the animals’ genetics provides robust evidence that they are adapting to survive a highly lethal, contagious cancer scientists feared would cause their extinction.
an illustration of the sars-cov-2 spike protein in purple tethered to the viral membrane in dark gray
Spike Protein Deletions Linked to COVID-19 Surges: Preprint
Alejandra Manjarrez | Jun 15, 2021
Researchers find that surges in COVID-19 case numbers are associated with deletions in the SARS-CoV-2 genome in an antigenic site of the spike protein. Some of these mutations are present in vaccine breakthrough infections or reinfections.
Blue-toned illustration of the DNA double helix, with additional DNA strands in the background
Nearly Complete Human Genome Sequenced
Jef Akst | Jun 8, 2021
In a preprint, researchers fill in some of the holes left in the first draft of the human genetic code, published at the turn of the century.