giraffe, genetics & genomics, CRISPR, gene editing, genome, physiology, hypertension, bone growth, techniques, mouse model
Genome Reveals Clues to Giraffes’ “Blatantly Strange” Body Shape
The physiological demands of that long neck get support from a gene involved in strengthening bones and blood vessels, researchers find after inserting the sequence in mice.
Genome Reveals Clues to Giraffes’ “Blatantly Strange” Body Shape
Genome Reveals Clues to Giraffes’ “Blatantly Strange” Body Shape

The physiological demands of that long neck get support from a gene involved in strengthening bones and blood vessels, researchers find after inserting the sequence in mice.

The physiological demands of that long neck get support from a gene involved in strengthening bones and blood vessels, researchers find after inserting the sequence in mice.

human behavior, evolution
lightning, life, Earth, meteorite, phosphorous, fulgurite, schreibersite, DNA, RNA, microbes, evolution
Lightning Might Have Sparked Early Life on Earth
Asher Jones | Mar 17, 2021
Electrical storms, rather than meteorites as scientists had previously thought, could have unlocked phosphorus necessary for the development of ancient life, according to a new study.
Cuttlefish, cephalopod, mollusk, mollusca, animal behavior, marshmallow test, cognition, intelligence, evolution
Cuttlefish Delay Gratification, a Sign of Smarts
Asher Jones | Mar 5, 2021
The cephalopods resisted temptation for up to 130 seconds to earn their favorite food, hinting at sophisticated cognitive abilities such as planning for the future.
Free Fallin’: How Scientists Study Unrestrained Insects
Amanda Heidt | Mar 1, 2021
Researchers are pulling from video games, sports broadcasting, meteorology, and even missile guidance technology to better investigate how insects have mastered flight.
Infographic: VR, Radar, and Other Tricks for Studying Insects
Amanda Heidt | Mar 1, 2021
Researchers are getting creative to understand flight behavior in the fast-moving and tiny animals.
Lessons from Darwin’s “Mischievous” Birds
Jonathan Meiburg | Mar 1, 2021
An unsung group of South American falcons yields clues to the prehistory of a continent, and hints at secrets of the avian brain.
Questions Raised About How an Ancient Hominin Moved
Abby Olena | Feb 24, 2021
A new analysis of the hand of the 4.4-million-year-old partial skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus indicates that the human ancestor may have climbed and swung through trees like chimpanzees do.
SARS-CoV-2 with Genomic Deletions Escapes an Antibody
Abby Olena | Feb 16, 2021
Researchers identify deletions in the N-terminal domain of the spike protein that allow the coronavirus to avoid antibody neutralization and that may contribute to the emergence of new variants.
moon, lunar, woman, biology, reproduction, fertility, menstrual cycle, menstruation, menses, period, synchronization
Menstrual Cycles Intermittently Sync with Moon Cycles: Study
Asher Jones | Feb 5, 2021
A long-term study finds that these rhythms align at certain times of women’s lives, shedding new light on the controversial idea that lunar phases influence human reproduction.
A Simple Genetic Change Adds Limb-Like Bones to Zebrafish Fins
Abby Olena | Feb 5, 2021
A gain-of-function mutation in a single gene reveals ancient limb-forming capacity that has been preserved for hundreds of millions of years.
mole-rat, naked mole-rat, animal behavior, social behavior, dialect, language, eusocial, evolution,
Naked Mole Rat Colonies Have Their Own Unique Dialects
Amanda Heidt | Feb 4, 2021
Chirp dialects appear to be enforced by the colony’s queen, but scientists aren’t sure how. 
Specialized Leaves Keep This Plant’s Fruit Warm
Shawna Williams | Feb 1, 2021
A volunteer nature guide teamed up with researchers to discover a unique reproductive role for one vine’s leaves.
Your Partner’s Genome May Affect Your Health
Catherine Offord | Jan 5, 2021
A study using data from more than 80,000 couples finds evidence of indirect genetic effects on traits ranging from smoking habits to mental health.
Tardigrades’ List of Super Powers Grows Ever Longer
Ashley Yeager | Jan 1, 2021
Water bears can survive extreme temperatures, oxidative stress, UV radiation, and more, but as work in climate change biology shows, they’re not invulnerable to everything.
Humans Domesticated Yeast Through Bread-Making: Study
Max Kozlov | Dec 11, 2020
Over centuries of cultivating Saccharomyces cerevisiae to make dough, bakers have put selective pressure on the species, causing it to diverge into two distinct groups, according to the authors.
Shrew Brains Shrink During Winter
Abby Olena | Dec 3, 2020
The animals kill off around one-quarter of the neurons in their somatosensory cortex, perhaps to save energy, and the cells appear to return the following summer.
Book Excerpt from When Brains Dream
Robert Stickgold, Antonio Zadra | Dec 1, 2020
Ferreting out the biological function of dreaming is a frontier in neuroscience.
Unearthed: World’s Oldest Animal Sperm—And It’s Giant
Max Kozlov | Dec 1, 2020
The sperm, belonging to a tiny marine crustacean, dates back nearly 100 million years, making it the most ancient animal sperm found to date.
Opinion: The Biological Function of Dreams
Robert Stickgold, Antonio Zadra | Dec 1, 2020
The scenarios that run through our sleeping brains may help us explore possible solutions to concerns from our waking lives.
Mosquitos in Asia and the Americas More Susceptible to Zika Virus
Abby Olena | Nov 19, 2020
A study explains how Zika was present among mosquitoes in Africa for decades without causing the harm to human health seen outside the continent in recent years.