human evolution, immunology
Who Is Immune to Zika?
Who Is Immune to Zika?
Amanda B. Keener | Oct 11, 2016
Researchers tap into ongoing dengue studies to improve antibody-based diagnostic tests for Zika and address unanswered questions about the emerging virus’s epidemiology.
Study: Enriched Housing Changes Murine T Cells
Study: Enriched Housing Changes Murine T Cells
Jef Akst | Oct 3, 2016
Mice that live in a more-stimulating environment for two weeks appear to develop a more-inflammatory immune state that might help protect the animals against infection. 
Notable Science Quotes
Notable Science Quotes
The Scientist Staff | Oct 1, 2016
Roger Tsien R.I.P., predatory publishing, and diversity in science
Saving Jon
Saving Jon
The Scientist Staff | Sep 30, 2016
Meet the researcher/entrepreneur who started a nonprofit that seeks to solve the science behind a rare disease that threatens the life of her younger brother.
“Out of Africa” Theory Gets the Genomic Treatment
“Out of Africa” Theory Gets the Genomic Treatment
Bob Grant | Sep 26, 2016
A trio of genetic studies on seldom-studied indigenous populations points to a single wave of migration as humanity wandered from its evolutionary homeland into the rest of the world.
Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure
Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure
Jef Akst | Sep 20, 2016
Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.
In Southern Africa, Human Genetics Tied to Environment
In Southern Africa, Human Genetics Tied to Environment
Jef Akst | Sep 7, 2016
Ancestries of nearly two dozen indigenous groups in the region reveal a close link between the genetic clustering of populations and the Kalahari Desert’s ecogeography.
What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs
What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs
Sandeep Ravindran | Sep 1, 2016
Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.
One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses
One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses
Ruth Williams | Aug 30, 2016
Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 
One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types
One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types
Ruth Williams | Aug 26, 2016
Precursor T cells bearing the same antigen receptor adopt two different fates in mice.