Ig Nobel Prizes, developmental biology
Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk
Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk
Jef Akst | Oct 1, 2015
Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.
Sex on the Brain
Sex on the Brain
Margaret M. McCarthy | Oct 1, 2015
Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.
Sex Differences in the Brain
Sex Differences in the Brain
Margaret M. McCarthy | Oct 1, 2015
How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.
Laugh, Then Think: The Ig Nobels
Laugh, Then Think: The Ig Nobels
Karen Zusi | Sep 21, 2015
This year’s awards honor research on bee stings, appendicitis, kissing, and more.
Whaling Specimens, 1930s
Whaling Specimens, 1930s
Amanda B. Keener | Sep 1, 2015
Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.
Q&A: Placental Ponderings
Q&A: Placental Ponderings
Christopher Coe | Aug 27, 2015
Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.
A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865
A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865
Amanda B. Keener | Aug 1, 2015
This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.
Leaving an Imprint
Leaving an Imprint
Anna Azvolinsky | Aug 1, 2015
Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.
Rethinking Lymphatic Development
Rethinking Lymphatic Development
Amanda B. Keener | Aug 1, 2015
Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.
Contributors
Contributors
Amanda B. Keener | Aug 1, 2015
Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.