Variety of sweeteners - Stevia, sugar, pollen and honey stock photo
How the Gut Differentiates Artificial Sweeteners from Sugars
Signals from sweeteners and sugars are relayed from the gut to the brain by different neural pathways, a new study concludes.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, LUIS ECHEVERRI URREA
How the Gut Differentiates Artificial Sweeteners from Sugars
How the Gut Differentiates Artificial Sweeteners from Sugars

Signals from sweeteners and sugars are relayed from the gut to the brain by different neural pathways, a new study concludes.

Signals from sweeteners and sugars are relayed from the gut to the brain by different neural pathways, a new study concludes.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, LUIS ECHEVERRI URREA
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