immune rejection, developmental biology, microbiology
Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod
Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod
Ben Andrew Henry | Nov 1, 2016
Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 
Contributors
Contributors
Ben Andrew Henry | Nov 1, 2016
Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.
Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy
Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy
Kelly Rae Chi | Nov 1, 2016
How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon
Viruses of the Human Body
Viruses of the Human Body
Eric Delwart | Nov 1, 2016
Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.
The Human Virome
The Human Virome
Eric Delwart | Oct 31, 2016
Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.
Bridging a Gap in the Brain
Bridging a Gap in the Brain
Ben Andrew Henry | Oct 12, 2016
Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.
Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea
Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea
Ruth Williams | Oct 12, 2016
Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.
Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia
Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia
Kelly Robinson and Julie Dunning Hotopp | Oct 1, 2016
Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?
Life Scientists Receive “Genius” Grants
Life Scientists Receive “Genius” Grants
Ben Andrew Henry | Sep 22, 2016
Among this year’s 23 MacArthur Foundation Fellows are pioneering biologists.
Image of the Day: All Aboard
Image of the Day: All Aboard
The Scientist Staff | Sep 22, 2016
This trainworm reproduces by detaching sperm- or egg-filled segments, called stolons, when it reaches maturity.