immunology, ecology, cell & molecular biology
Dead Cane Toads Are Deadly
Edyta Zielinska | Jul 5, 2011
The deadly-when-eaten invasive amphibians that have been plaguing Australian wildlife for years continue to poison even after they’re dead.
Brain Cells Self-Amplify
Jef Akst | Jul 5, 2011
A certain type of neural precursor does it all—replaces itself, differentiates into specialized brain cells, and multiplies into more stem-cell-like cells.
Exosome Explosion
Exosome Explosion
Clotilde Théry, Clotilde Théry | Jul 1, 2011
These small membrane vesicles do much more than clean up a cell’s trash—they also carry signals to distant parts of the body, where they can impact multiple dimensions of cellular life.
Americans Support Stem Cell Research
Jef Akst | Jul 1, 2011
A new study finds that more than two thirds of Americans approve of the use of stem cells in research aiming to cure serious diseases.
A Scar Nobly Got
Michael Willrich | Jul 1, 2011
The story of the US government’s efforts to stamp out smallpox in the early 20th century offers insights into the science and practice of mass vaccination.
Exosome Basics
Exosome Basics
Clotilde Théry, Clotilde Théry | Jul 1, 2011
Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted by most cell types. Internal vesicles form by the inward budding of cellular compartments known as multivesicular endosomes (MVE). 
The Ninefold Ring
Richard P. Grant | Jul 1, 2011
Editor’s Choice in Structural Biology
Thymus Finder
Richard P. Grant | Jul 1, 2011
Editor’s Choice in Immunology
C-ing with the Lights Out
Richard P. Grant | Jul 1, 2011
I the dark Arctic shallows one research finds heterotrophic marine bacteria doing a surprising amount of carbon fixing.
Scientist to Watch
Alison McCook | Jul 1, 2011
“This is my trophy,” says biologist Michael Edidin, walking across his office at Johns Hopkins University to pick up two oversized clock hands, once part of the stately clock tower that still stands on the Baltimore campus.