indians, genetics & genomics, ecology, culture, cell & molecular biology
C-ing with the Lights Out
Richard P. Grant | Jul 1, 2011
I the dark Arctic shallows one research finds heterotrophic marine bacteria doing a surprising amount of carbon fixing.
The Ninefold Ring
Richard P. Grant | Jul 1, 2011
Editor’s Choice in Structural Biology
Capsule Reviews
Richard P. Grant | Jul 1, 2011
Solar, The Dark X, The Sky's Dark Labyrinth, Spiral
Exosome Basics
Exosome Basics
Clotilde Théry, Clotilde Théry | Jul 1, 2011
Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted by most cell types. Internal vesicles form by the inward budding of cellular compartments known as multivesicular endosomes (MVE). 
A Scar Nobly Got
Michael Willrich | Jul 1, 2011
The story of the US government’s efforts to stamp out smallpox in the early 20th century offers insights into the science and practice of mass vaccination.
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jul 1, 2011
Meet some of the people featured in the July 2011 issue of The Scientist.
Book excerpt from Pox: An American History
Michael Willrich | Jul 1, 2011
In Chapter 5, "The Stable and the Laboratory," author Michael Willrich explores the burgeoning vaccine manufacture industry that ramped up to combat smallpox epidemics in turn-of-the-twentieth-century American cities.
Speaking of Science
N/A | Jul 1, 2011
July 2011's selection of notable quotes
Trading Pelts for Pestilence
Jef Akst | Jul 1, 2011
When European explorers and fishermen began to frequent Canada’s shores in the 16th century, they brought with them a plethora of tools and trinkets, including knives, axes, kettles, and blankets. 
Scientist to Watch
Alison McCook | Jul 1, 2011
“This is my trophy,” says biologist Michael Edidin, walking across his office at Johns Hopkins University to pick up two oversized clock hands, once part of the stately clock tower that still stands on the Baltimore campus.