insects, cell & molecular biology, developmental biology, microbiology
Diseases From Ticks and Mosquitoes Have Tripled
Diseases From Ticks and Mosquitoes Have Tripled
Kerry Grens | May 1, 2018
Warmer weather is thought to be behind the rise in vector-borne illnesses in recent years.
Caught on Camera
Caught on Camera
The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2018
Selected rare-disease Images of the Day from the-scientist.com
Researchers Turn to Implantable Robots to Regenerate Tissue
Researchers Turn to Implantable Robots to Regenerate Tissue
Shawna Williams | May 1, 2018
The devices, which could one day treat children with esophageal atresia and short bowel, were recently tested in pigs.
Colorblindness Study Reveals Unexpected Way to Make Blood Vessels
Colorblindness Study Reveals Unexpected Way to Make Blood Vessels
Ashley Yeager | May 1, 2018
Researchers stumbled across the connection while searching for ways to reduce vision problems in people with achromatopsia.
Infographic: Piecing the Cholesterol Puzzle
Infographic: Piecing the Cholesterol Puzzle
Diana Kwon | May 1, 2018
How a rare disease led to an understanding of the basics of cholesterol regulation.
How Bacteria Eat Penicillin
How Bacteria Eat Penicillin
Shawna Williams | Apr 30, 2018
Scientists work out the specific genes and biochemical steps required for digesting the very drugs designed to kill microbes.
Trailblazing Endocrinologist Neena Schwartz Dies
Trailblazing Endocrinologist Neena Schwartz Dies
Kerry Grens | Apr 27, 2018
The reproductive biologist uncovered hormones important for fertility cycles.
Studies Show How Cells Differentiate at Life’s Beginning
Studies Show How Cells Differentiate at Life’s Beginning
Shawna Williams | Apr 27, 2018
A trio of papers provide new insight into embryo development.
Image of the Day: Glowing Tick
Image of the Day: Glowing Tick
The Scientist Staff | Apr 27, 2018
This lone star tick’s bite can cause an allergy to red meat.
Worms’ Magnetic Sense Questioned
Worms’ Magnetic Sense Questioned
Abby Olena | Apr 25, 2018
Unsuccessful attempts to reproduce the results of a 2015 study reporting that C. elegans orient themselves by Earth’s magnetic field spark debate among researchers.