iPSCs, culture, evolution
Speaking of Vision Science
Speaking of Vision Science
The Scientist Staff | Oct 1, 2014
October 2014's selection of notable quotes
Predator Demoted
Predator Demoted
Jef Akst | Oct 1, 2014
Extinct, giant arthropods, long assumed to be top predators of ancient seas, didn’t have sharp enough eyesight to be refined hunters.
Science Gone Social
Science Gone Social
Sara K. Yeo, Michael A. Xenos, Dietram A. Scheufele, Michael A. Cacciatore, Dominique Brossard | Oct 1, 2014
Scientists are beginning to embrace social media as a viable means of communicating with public audiences.
Eyes on the Prize
Eyes on the Prize
Jeffrey M. Perkel | Oct 1, 2014
A handful of stem cell therapeutics for vision disorders are showing promise in early-stage trials, and still more are in development. But there’s a long road to travel before patients see real benefit.
 
Sleep Tight
Sleep Tight
Emily Monosson | Oct 1, 2014
Bed bugs are but one example of a species whose populations have evolved in response to human behavior.
Book Excerpt from <em>Unnatural Selection</em>
Book Excerpt from Unnatural Selection
Emily Monosson | Oct 1, 2014
In chapter 5, “Resurgence: Bedbugs Bite Back,” author Emily Monosson chronicles the rise of the pesky pests in the face of humanity’s best chemical efforts.
All Eyes On Stem Cells
All Eyes On Stem Cells
Jeffrey M. Perkel | Oct 1, 2014
See the striking images behind the quest to develop stem cell therapeutics for vision disorders.
The Rainbow Connection
The Rainbow Connection
Kerry Grens | Oct 1, 2014
Color vision as we know it resulted from one fortuitous genetic event after another.
Setting the Record Straight
Setting the Record Straight
Daniel Cossins | Oct 1, 2014
Scientists are taking to social media to challenge weak research, share replication attempts in real time, and counteract hype. Will this online discourse enrich the scientific process?
Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time
Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time
Jyoti Madhusoodanan | Sep 25, 2014
Tetra fish adapted to extreme darkness lose circadian metabolic rhythms to conserve energy, according to a study.