Lamarck, evolution, microbiology
Size Matters
Size Matters
Tracy Vence | Jul 1, 2014
The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.
Geni-Tales
Geni-Tales
Menno Schilthuizen | Jul 1, 2014
Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.
 
The Sooner, The Better
The Sooner, The Better
Nicholette Zeliadt | Jul 1, 2014
New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.
The Sex Paradox
The Sex Paradox
Megan Scudellari | Jul 1, 2014
Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?
Sly Guys
Sly Guys
The Scientist Staff | Jul 1, 2014
Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.
Omnivore Ancestors?
Omnivore Ancestors?
Jyoti Madhusoodanan | Jun 26, 2014
Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat and vegetables.
Mobile Microbiome
Mobile Microbiome
Jyoti Madhusoodanan | Jun 26, 2014
Cell phones are populated with many bacteria commonly found on users’ hands. 
Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance
Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance
Jef Akst | Jun 25, 2014
E. coli repeatedly exposed to ampicillin adapt to stay dormant for longer periods of time—just long enough to outlast the antibiotic treatment.
The Wound Microbiome
The Wound Microbiome
Kerry Grens | Jun 23, 2014
Determining which critters are present in an infected wound could aid in treatment, particularly of soldiers injured in combat.
Re-examining Rots
Re-examining Rots
Jyoti Madhusoodanan | Jun 23, 2014
Fungi that digest wood in novel ways could fuel new avenues of research on cellulosic ethanol, and suggest a need to move beyond traditional classification systems.