lung cancer, evolution, culture
Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family
Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 2, 2017
The Tapanuli orangutan has been identified as the newest species of great ape, but also likely the most endangered. 
The Benefits of Trepidation
The Benefits of Trepidation
Abigail Marsh | Nov 1, 2017
While wiping fear from our brains may seem attractive, the emotion is an essential part of our behavioral repertoire.
Dealing with Unethical or Illegal Conduct in Higher Education
Dealing with Unethical or Illegal Conduct in Higher Education
Anna Azvolinsky | Nov 1, 2017
Investigations into cases of wrongdoing by professors are increasingly in the public eye. But are colleges and universities doing enough to deal with the problem?
These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls
These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls
Mary Bates | Nov 1, 2017
The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.
Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia
Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia
Steve Graff | Nov 1, 2017
These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.
Ten-Minute Sabbatical
Ten-Minute Sabbatical
The Scientist Staff | Nov 1, 2017
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
2017 Life Science Salary Survey
2017 Life Science Salary Survey
Aggie Mika | Nov 1, 2017
Industry professionals make more than academic researchers, but for professors, it may not be about the money.
These Flies Suck. . . Frogs
These Flies Suck. . . Frogs
The Scientist Staff | Oct 31, 2017
Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.
Salary Survey: By the Numbers
Salary Survey: By the Numbers
Aggie Mika | Oct 31, 2017
An overview of this year's results in graphical form
The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees
The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees
Shawna Williams | Oct 24, 2017
Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.