lysosomes, evolution, ecology
Week in Review: June 16–20
Week in Review: June 16–20
Tracy Vence | Jun 20, 2014
Early Neanderthal evolution; developing antivirals to combat polio; the mouth and skin microbiomes; insect-inspired, flight-stabilizing sensors
Skull Collection Helps Explain Early Neanderthal Evolution
Skull Collection Helps Explain Early Neanderthal Evolution
Anna Azvolinsky | Jun 19, 2014
An examination of 17 ancient skulls shows that some Neanderthal features arose as far back as 430,000 years ago.
Ancient Fish Analyzed
Ancient Fish Analyzed
Rina Shaikh-Lesko | Jun 13, 2014
Two paleontological findings yield insights into early vertebrate evolution.
Snake Imitators Persist
Snake Imitators Persist
Rina Shaikh-Lesko | Jun 12, 2014
A harmless snake in the Carolina Sandhills has been mimicking a poisonous species for decades, and has become a better imitator since the latter went extinct.
Faces for Fighting?
Faces for Fighting?
Jef Akst | Jun 10, 2014
Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.
Combating Asian Carp
Combating Asian Carp
Jef Akst | Jun 5, 2014
A new plan to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive species is set in motion.
Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>
Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey
Robert Dudley | Jun 1, 2014
In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.
Drunks and Monkeys
Drunks and Monkeys
Robert Dudley | Jun 1, 2014
Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.
 
Wild Relatives
Wild Relatives
Hannes Dempewolf, Nora P. Castañeda-Álvarez, Colin K. Khoury | Jun 1, 2014
As rich sources of genetic diversity, the progenitors and kin of today’s food crops hold great promise for improving production in agriculture’s challenging future.
For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival
For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival
Sandhya Sekar | May 29, 2014
Two island populations of male crickets independently evolved to evade parasites by keeping quiet, and have come up with a way to sneak matings with females that still seek the male courtship song.