membrane proteins, culture
National plan save bats
Cristina Luiggi | May 19, 2011
In light of the looming threat of extinction of North American bat populations brought on by the lethal and rapidly spreading disease known as white nose syndrome, the US Fish and Wildlife Service unveiled this week a national plan for coordinating efforts for combatting the disease at the loca, state, and federal level.
Tibetan medical paintings
Cristina Luiggi | May 15, 2011
Seventeenth-century Tibet witnessed a blossoming of medical knowledge, with the construction of a monastic medical college and the penning of several influential medical texts. Perhaps most striking was a set of 79 paintings, known as tangkas, which
Gays have higher cancer risk?
Jef Akst | May 14, 2011
Gay men are nearly twice as likely to report that they've had cancer as heterosexual men, according to a US health survey published in Cancer.
Billion dollar babies of the human genome
Jef Akst | May 14, 2011
The Human Genome Project has generated nearly $800 billion in economic output and hundreds of thousands of jobs in genomics and related industries.
Best Places to Work Industry, 2011
Hannah Waters | May 1, 2011
By forging new relationships and finding novel uses for existing technologies, this year’s top companies are employing creative ways to advance their science.
Opinion: The decline of physiology
R.J. Naftalin | Apr 19, 2011
Medical schools in the UK are teaching physiology courses primarily focused on clinical applications with much curtailed practical laboratory training to the detriment of medical education
The Movement of Goods Around the Cell
Patricia Bassereau and Bruno Goud | Apr 1, 2011
A biologist and a physicist collaborate on a decade-long exploration of the physical parameters of membrane traffic in eukaryotic cells.
Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687
Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687
Cristina Luiggi | Apr 1, 2011
Seventeenth-century Tibet witnessed a blossoming of medical knowledge, including a set of 79 paintings, known as tangkas, that interweaved practical medical knowledge with Buddhist traditions and local lore.
Optical Tweezers
Patricia Bassereau and Bruno Goud | Apr 1, 2011
Institut Curie researchers Bruno Goud, a biologist, and Patricia Bassereau, a physicist, talk about their fruitful, decade-long collaboration exploring the physics of membrane trafficking in a Skype interview conducted by Associate Editor Richard P. Grant.
Capsule Reviews
Bob Grant | Apr 1, 2011
The Great Sperm Whale, Noble Cows & Hybrid Zebras, Radioactive, Science-Mart