microbiota
Early-Life Microbiome
Early-Life Microbiome
Tracy Vence | Jun 16, 2016
Analyzing the gut microbiomes of children from birth through toddlerhood, researchers tie compositional changes to birth mode, infant diet, and antibiotic therapy.
Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung
Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung
Tracy Vence | May 25, 2016
Researchers assess some of the downstream effects of treating livestock with a broad-spectrum antibiotic.
Restoring C-Section Babies’ Microbiota
Restoring C-Section Babies’ Microbiota
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2016
A small pilot study suggests exposure to maternal vaginal fluids could restore infant microbiota following Cesarean-section delivery.
Speaking of Science
Speaking of Science
The Scientist Staff | Feb 1, 2016
February 2016's selection of notable quotes
Microbesity
Microbesity
Jenny Rood | Nov 1, 2015
Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.
Adapting to Elevated CO<sub>2</sub>
Adapting to Elevated CO2
Rina Shaikh-Lesko | Sep 1, 2015
High carbon dioxide levels can irreversibly rev up a cyanobacterium’s ability to fix nitrogen over the long term, a study finds.
Pregnancy Stress Can Affect Offspring’s Microbiomes
Pregnancy Stress Can Affect Offspring’s Microbiomes
Amanda B. Keener | Jun 17, 2015
A study in mice suggests stress during pregnancy can affect offspring's microbiota and brain metabolism.
Contact Lenses Can Change the Ocular Microbiome
Contact Lenses Can Change the Ocular Microbiome
Amanda B. Keener | Jun 1, 2015
A study finds that wearing contact lenses may alter the composition of the bacterial community living on the surface of the eye.
Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota
Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota
Anna Azvolinsky | Mar 19, 2015
Increasing the abundance of a chemical some microbes use to communicate with one another can help reinstate beneficial bacterial populations in the guts of antibiotic-treated mice. 
Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity
Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity
Jef Akst | Mar 10, 2015
Microbes identified in a city’s sewage treatment plants correlate with the population’s obesity rate, a study shows.