microfluidics, developmental biology, ecology
Bug Fest 2011
Bug Fest 2011
Edyta Zielinska | Aug 25, 2011
Earlier this month (August 13-14) thousands of children and bug-loving adults descended on the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, where all manner of insect—dead, alive, and deep fried—were on display to be looked at, touched and, yes...eaten.
Beetle Mania
Edyta Zielinska | Aug 25, 2011
Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences was crawling with bugs, and The Scientist went down to join in the fun.
Dengue-Resistant Mosquitoes
Tia Ghose | Aug 24, 2011
Mosquitoes infected with the Wolbachia bacteria, which fail to transmit the dengue virus, spread through the population when released in the wild.
EPA to Address Nitrogen Pollution
Cristina Luiggi | Aug 23, 2011
The federal agency should reduce harmful nitrogen emissions by 25 percent in the next two decades, a new report says.
Fair Trade at Plant Roots
Kerry Grens | Aug 11, 2011
Plant and fungal symbionts swap more resources with partners that provide a greater return of nutrients.
Next Generation: Hundreds of Cell-Analyses at Once
Edyta Zielinska | Aug 11, 2011
A new microfluidics chip lets researchers analyze the nucleic acids of 300 individual cells simultaneously.
Lab-Grown Sperm
Cristina Luiggi | Aug 4, 2011
Healthy mice are born from germ cell precursors grown in vitro.
Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain
Tom Curran | Aug 1, 2011
Sequencing the DNA of individual neurons is a way to dissect the genes underlying major neurological and psychological disorders.
Seirian Sumner: Wasp Whisperer
Cristina Luiggi | Aug 1, 2011
Research Fellow, Institute of Zoology, London. Age: 37
From the Ground Up
From the Ground Up
Richard D. Bardgett | Aug 1, 2011
As the planet warms plant growth will likely increase—locking up some of that extra carbon dioxide by converting it into vegetative biomass—but that’s not the whole story.