microscope, immunology, developmental biology, genetics & genomics
Stem Cells: Old vs. New
Bob Grant | Dec 2, 2011
A new study finds key differences between established and new human embryonic stem cell lines.
Astronaut Worms Return from Space
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2011
After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.
Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2011
Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42
Eye of Newt
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.
Sensing Fat
Beverly J. Tepper and Kathleen L. Keller | Dec 1, 2011
Are genes that alter the perception of fat making us fat?
Teen DNA Detectives
Kerry Grens | Dec 1, 2011
Genomicist Mark Stoeckle and three high school students have taken do-it-yourself science to a new level. 
Newts' New Eyes
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 
Flow Cytometry for the Masses
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.
Barcode High
Kerry Grens | Dec 1, 2011
The story of a group of high school students who, with the help of a Rockefeller University researcher, conducted and published studies on the biological provenance of sushi and teas from around New York City.
Breaching the Wall
Rachel Nuwer | Dec 1, 2011
Editor’s choice in immunology