mTOR, developmental biology, cell & molecular biology
Image of the Day: See You Later!
Image of the Day: See You Later!
The Scientist Staff | Jan 8, 2018
Developmental biologists take a close look at how alligator embryos grow. 
Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief
Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2018
The race to develop analgesic drugs that inhibit sodium channel NaV1.7 is revealing a complex sensory role for the protein.
Glial Ties to Persistent Pain
Glial Ties to Persistent Pain
Mark R. Hutchinson | Jan 1, 2018
Immune-like cells in the central nervous system are now recognized as key participants in the creation and maintenance of persistent pain.
Infographic: A Painful Pathway
Infographic: A Painful Pathway
Catherine Offord | Dec 31, 2017
Since the mid-2000s, the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 has emerged as a promising target for a new class of analgesics.
Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body
Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body
Mark R. Hutchinson | Dec 31, 2017
The acute pain that results from injury or disease is very different from chronic pain.
Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
Ruth Williams | Dec 7, 2017
Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.
Image of the Day: Actin Burst
Image of the Day: Actin Burst
The Scientist Staff | Dec 6, 2017
Researchers are looking at actin polymerization and calcium uptake in human cells to study mitochondrial division.
Passing the Torch
Passing the Torch
Mary Beth Aberlin | Dec 1, 2017
Looking back, looking forward
Researchers Make Knockout Stem Cell Lines in One Step
Researchers Make Knockout Stem Cell Lines in One Step
Ruth Williams | Dec 1, 2017
Combining gene editing and stem-cell induction improves efficiency of functional genetic analyses.
Captivated by Chromosomes
Captivated by Chromosomes
Anna Azvolinsky | Dec 1, 2017
Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.