multimedia, immunology
Image of the Day: Cooking Up Neurons
Image of the Day: Cooking Up Neurons
The Scientist Staff | May 11, 2018
Using different combinations of transcription factors, researchers create a diverse array of neurons from mouse skin cells.
Image of the Day: Glowing Tide
Image of the Day: Glowing Tide
The Scientist Staff | May 10, 2018
Each year, bioluminescent microorganisms create striking displays on the beaches of San Diego.
Genetic Screen Predicts T-Cell Lymphoma Aggression
Genetic Screen Predicts T-Cell Lymphoma Aggression
Kerry Grens | May 9, 2018
Sequencing of a single gene can spot patients with a dangerous form of mycosis fungoides better than other prognostic tests.  
Image of the Day: Hold My Brood
Image of the Day: Hold My Brood
The Scientist Staff | May 9, 2018
Cuckoo catfish trick cichlids into caring for their eggs in a strategy known as brood parasitism.
Image of the Day: Bacterial Flagella
Image of the Day: Bacterial Flagella
The Scientist Staff | May 8, 2018
Real-time imaging reveals the formation of the bacterial flagella FlhA ring.
Image of the Day: The Five Percent
Image of the Day: The Five Percent
The Scientist Staff | May 7, 2018
A map of neural networks in the striatum of the mouse brain reveals clues about psychiatric and movement disorders.
Image of the Day: Bird Braincase
Image of the Day: Bird Braincase
The Scientist Staff | May 4, 2018
Newly discovered fossils shed light on the structure of the feeding apparatus of ancient seabirds.
Image of the Day: A-maize-ing!
Image of the Day: A-maize-ing!
The Scientist Staff | May 3, 2018
By combining alleles involved in plant height, an agricultural scientist has grown the world’s tallest cornstalk, breaking his own record set in 2017.
Image of the Day: Spammed by Hydra
Image of the Day: Spammed by Hydra
The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2018
A junk mail filter can learn to pick out six behaviors of hydras by analyzing hours of video footage.
Image of the Day: An Eyeful
Image of the Day: An Eyeful
The Scientist Staff | Apr 30, 2018
The physiological changes that can occur in the retinas of patients with cerebral malaria may provide a useful approach to diagnosis.