neuron, developmental biology
How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop
How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop
Kelly Rae Chi | Dec 1, 2016
Sequencing and gene-editing advances make tracing a cells journey throughout development easier than ever.
Barcoding the Connectome
Barcoding the Connectome
The Scientist Staff | Nov 10, 2016
Watch how researchers use RNA to track where neurons' axons end in the mouse brain.
Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy
Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy
Kelly Rae Chi | Nov 1, 2016
How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon
Neural Connectome Method Uses mRNA Barcodes
Neural Connectome Method Uses mRNA Barcodes
Ruth Williams | Nov 1, 2016
Researchers swap microscopy for RNA sequencing to track neural paths in the mouse brain.
 
Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease
Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease
Mutaz Musa | Nov 1, 2016
No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 
Two-Photon Microscopy’s Historic Influence on Neuroscience
Two-Photon Microscopy’s Historic Influence on Neuroscience
Alison F. Takemura | Nov 1, 2016
In the 1990s, the development of this gentler and more precise microscopy method improved scientists’ ability to probe neurons’ activity and anatomy.
Genetic Tags Illuminate Where Neurons Extend
Genetic Tags Illuminate Where Neurons Extend
Ruth Williams | Oct 31, 2016
Barcodes of mRNA travel to the cells' axon terminals, offering a sequencing-based approach to neural mapping.
Bridging a Gap in the Brain
Bridging a Gap in the Brain
Ben Andrew Henry | Oct 12, 2016
Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.
Nascent Neurons Journey Through Newborn Brain
Nascent Neurons Journey Through Newborn Brain
Anna Azvolinsky | Oct 6, 2016
Young cells make their way to the frontal lobe to create new circuits in the brains of infants, researchers report. 
Image of the Day: All Aboard
Image of the Day: All Aboard
The Scientist Staff | Sep 22, 2016
This trainworm reproduces by detaching sperm- or egg-filled segments, called stolons, when it reaches maturity.