neuroscience, evolution, microbiology, ecology
Magnetic Swimmers Cultured
Tia Ghose | Dec 22, 2011
For the first time, researchers culture a bacteria that uses a magnetic sulfide compound to navigate.
Unsilencing a Gene
Tia Ghose | Dec 21, 2011
Scientists have found a way to reactivate a gene in mice that is silenced in a neurodevelopmental disorder called Angelman syndrome.
The Evolution of Drug Resistance
Ruth Williams | Dec 18, 2011
Researchers use whole-genome sequencing to keep tabs on the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.
Monkeys Track Radiation
Edyta Zielinska | Dec 16, 2011
Scientists near the Fukushima plant are equipping wild monkeys with radiation collars to get better sense of their exposure in the wild.
Neuroscience Not Ready for the Courtroom
Tia Ghose | Dec 14, 2011
Certain neuroscience techniques are not robust enough to be used as evidence in a trial, a new report says.
Brightness of Buttercups
Edyta Zielinska | Dec 13, 2011
Researchers explain the luminous quality of yellow buttercups.
Darwin Didn't Plagiarize Wallace
Bob Grant | Dec 13, 2011
19th century shipping records defy the claim that Charles Darwin stole some of Alfred Russel Wallace's ideas to craft his theory of evolution.
Why People Lost Their Fur
Ruth Williams | Dec 12, 2011
The need for ancient humans to keep cool during the day might explain their lack of body hair but not why they walked on two feet.
How Bees Choose Home
Tia Ghose | Dec 8, 2011
For honeybees, there’s no place like home. And every year, they must find a new one. Now, a study publishing today (December 8) in Science suggests that the honeybee swarms use inhibitory signals when house-hunting, paralleling the human brain’s decision-making process.
Yawns More Contagious Among Friends
Jef Akst | Dec 7, 2011
People who are emotionally connected are more likely to catch the yawns from one another.