Shrinking Quarantine
Shrinking Quarantine
The CDC now suggests that only children who were within 3 feet, not 6 feet, of an infected student should quarantine, provided they were masked in a classroom. Does the science support this change?
Shrinking Quarantine
Shrinking Quarantine

The CDC now suggests that only children who were within 3 feet, not 6 feet, of an infected student should quarantine, provided they were masked in a classroom. Does the science support this change?

The CDC now suggests that only children who were within 3 feet, not 6 feet, of an infected student should quarantine, provided they were masked in a classroom. Does the science support this change?

news feature
How Commensal Gut Bacteria Keep Pathogens in Check
How Commensal Gut Bacteria Keep Pathogens in Check
Alejandra Manjarrez | Oct 14, 2021
Recent studies describe how resident microbiota appear to outcompete unwelcome visitors, either with superior weaponry or by guzzling up local resources.  
When the Immune Response Makes COVID-19 Worse
When the Immune Response Makes COVID-19 Worse
Alejandra Manjarrez | Sep 27, 2021
If the immune system makes mistakes—reacting late or getting the target wrong—it can amplify the damage wrought by SARS-CoV-2.
Moderna vs. Pfizer: Is There a “Best” mRNA Vaccine?
Moderna vs. Pfizer: Is There a “Best” mRNA Vaccine?
Alejandra Manjarrez | Sep 24, 2021
Both of the mRNA vaccines available in the US are highly effective against severe COVID-19, but recent studies suggest that Moderna’s elicits a stronger immune response and might be better at preventing breakthrough infections.  
Louisiana Scientists Are Still Reeling from Ida
Louisiana Scientists Are Still Reeling from Ida
Emma Yasinski | Sep 14, 2021
Some Louisiana research centers lost samples and reagents, and with power only just now being restored, there’s a long road ahead to full recovery.
A Surge in Pandemic Research Shines a Spotlight on Preprints
A Surge in Pandemic Research Shines a Spotlight on Preprints
Diana Kwon | Sep 10, 2021
Many scientists have turned to preprints to rapidly disseminate their research on COVID-19, but some disagree with this approach.
How Wildfire Smoke Raises Infectious Disease Risk
How Wildfire Smoke Raises Infectious Disease Risk
Amanda Heidt | Sep 8, 2021
As fires blanket growing swathes of the West, scientists are beginning to understand more about how their smoke affects the transmission and severity of COVID-19 and other illnesses, and how it differs from that of other types of air pollution.
Plenty of Evidence for Recombination in SARS-CoV-2
Plenty of Evidence for Recombination in SARS-CoV-2
Abby Olena | Sep 2, 2021
Different variants of the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic are swapping chunks of genetic material, but it’s not yet clear what implications that may have for public health.
Dissecting the Unusual Biology of the SARS-CoV-2 Delta Variant
Dissecting the Unusual Biology of the SARS-CoV-2 Delta Variant
Katarina Zimmer | Aug 9, 2021
An ability to build up higher concentrations of viral particles in people’s airways and mutations that might boost its ability to infect human cells could be what gives the Delta variant its evolutionary edge.
The Extinct Species Within
The Extinct Species Within
Christie Wilcox | Aug 6, 2021
The genomes of living animals are littered with DNA from long-gone relatives, providing a lens on evolution, past extinctions, and perhaps even solutions to agricultural problems.
Religion on the Brain
Religion on the Brain
Emma Yasinski | Jul 13, 2021
Researchers in a small but growing field search for neural correlates of religiosity and spirituality.
The Pandemic Crushed the Flu—What Happens When It Returns?
The Pandemic Crushed the Flu—What Happens When It Returns?
Diana Kwon | Jul 7, 2021
Cases of influenza and other respiratory viruses sank dramatically during the pandemic, with potential implications for both people and pathogens.  
Study that Impregnated Male Rats Stirs Controversy
Study that Impregnated Male Rats Stirs Controversy
Andy Tay | Jun 25, 2021
A combination of approaches, including uterus transplantation and the joining of two animals’ circulatory systems, allowed males to bear pups, according to a preprint. But some experts say the experiments were not justified.  
COVID-19 Vaccine Combos Aim to Boost Immunity
COVID-19 Vaccine Combos Aim to Boost Immunity
Asher Jones | Mar 9, 2021
Mix-and-match shots could simplify vaccine rollout and stimulate more-robust immune responses. Ongoing clinical trials will soon give answers.
What Pseudoviruses Bring to the Study of SARS-CoV-2
What Pseudoviruses Bring to the Study of SARS-CoV-2
Amanda Heidt | Feb 16, 2021
Engineered viruses that don’t replicate provide a tractable model for scientists to safely study SARS-CoV-2, including research into vaccine efficacy and emerging variants.
Vaccines Versus the Mutants
Vaccines Versus the Mutants
Anthony King | Feb 8, 2021
Facing new variants of SARS-CoV-2, some vaccines may offer more robust protection or be more easily redesigned to target them.
Will Delaying Vaccine Doses Cause a Coronavirus Escape Mutant?
Will Delaying Vaccine Doses Cause a Coronavirus Escape Mutant?
Chris Baraniuk | Feb 4, 2021
With many millions of people waiting several weeks to receive a second COVID-19 vaccine dose in some countries, experts consider the possibility that SARS-CoV-2 could evolve vaccine resistance.
Reduced Adult Neurogenesis Linked with Alzheimer’s Disease
Reduced Adult Neurogenesis Linked with Alzheimer’s Disease
Abby Olena | Feb 1, 2021
Manipulating the production of new neurons can improve cognition in animal models of the disease, raising the possibility that figuring out a way for humans to make more neurons could make a difference for people with dementia.
Special report
A Guide to Emerging SARS-CoV-2 Variants
A Guide to Emerging SARS-CoV-2 Variants
Katarina Zimmer | Jan 26, 2021
Scientists across the world are closely tracking the spread of mutations in the coronavirus and investigating whether they could render current vaccines less effective.
SARS-CoV-2 Isn’t Going Away, Experts Predict
SARS-CoV-2 Isn’t Going Away, Experts Predict
David Adam | Jan 25, 2021
As politicians try to schedule an end to the pandemic, scientists say the virus will stick around as an endemic disease similar to the common cold.