NIH, microbiology, immunology
<em>Art + Science Now</em>
Art + Science Now
Bob Grant | Sep 1, 2011
The book that serves as bio art's encyclopedia.
Beyond Expectation
Karen Hopkin | Sep 1, 2011
Philippa “Pippa” Marrack has made some unanticipated discoveries about how the immune system functions in health and disease.
The Cytokine Cycle
The Cytokine Cycle
W. Sue T. Griffin | Sep 1, 2011
The initiating cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown. However, from our studies it’s clear that many types of neuronal damage—­­from traumatic brain injury, to epilepsy, infection, or genetic predisposition—­can activate brain immune cells—microglia and astrocytes-- promoting them to produce IL-1 and S100 inflammatory cytokines.
Piggyback Pathogen
Jessica P. Johnson | Sep 1, 2011
Editor’s Choice in Immunology
The Age-Old Fight Against Antibiotics
Cristina Luiggi | Aug 31, 2011
Researchers find antibiotic resistance genes in 30,000-year-old bacteria, suggesting such resistance is not a modern phenomenon.
Blood’s Role in the Aging Brain
Edyta Zielinska | Aug 31, 2011
A blood protein involved in allergy contributes to the decline in brain function and memory in aging mice.
Hiding Under a Cap
Richard P. Grant | Aug 30, 2011
Editor's Choice in Immunology
NIH Finalizes Conflict Rules
Bob Grant | Aug 25, 2011
America's key federal biomedical research agency officially releases its new policy on conflicts of interest.
NIH Biased Against Blacks?
Bob Grant | Aug 22, 2011
A new study reveals that African American researchers are 10 percent less likely to receive funding from the federal agency than their white peers.
Alzheimer’s Mice Still Available
Jessica P. Johnson | Aug 17, 2011
Dropped from a patent lawsuit, at least one lab will be allowed to continue research on mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease.