Infographic: A Plant Cell’s Cuticle Helps Regulate Toxic Chemical Accumulation
Infographic: A Plant Cell’s Cuticle Helps Regulate Toxic Chemical Accumulation
Researchers found that thinning petunia cells’ cuticles caused them to slow production of volatile organic compounds.
Infographic: A Plant Cell’s Cuticle Helps Regulate Toxic Chemical Accumulation
Infographic: A Plant Cell’s Cuticle Helps Regulate Toxic Chemical Accumulation

Researchers found that thinning petunia cells’ cuticles caused them to slow production of volatile organic compounds.

Researchers found that thinning petunia cells’ cuticles caused them to slow production of volatile organic compounds.

organogenesis, cell & molecular biology
Infographic: A Plant Cell’s Cuticle Helps Regulate Toxic Chemical Accumulation
Infographic: A Plant Cell’s Cuticle Helps Regulate Toxic Chemical Accumulation
Ashley Yeager | Feb 1, 2021
Researchers found that thinning petunia cells’ cuticles caused them to slow production of volatile organic compounds.
Petunia’s Waxy Cuticle Regulates the Plant’s Sweet Smell
Petunia’s Waxy Cuticle Regulates the Plant’s Sweet Smell
Ashley Yeager | Feb 1, 2021
The thicker the flower petals’ cuticle, the more fragrance compounds the plant releases, according to a recent study.
Feeling the Foundation
Feeling the Foundation
Bob Grant | Feb 1, 2021
This year has started out in a fashion that is sadly similar to the way 2020 unspooled. But the steady pace of scientific discovery helps maintain our sense of hope.
Siobhán Brady Uses Big Data to Investigate Plant Development
Siobhán Brady Uses Big Data to Investigate Plant Development
Shawna Williams | Feb 1, 2021
The University of California, Davis, professor is a pioneer in teasing apart the changes in gene expression that drive root development.
Retrons Help Bacteria Defend Themselves from Phages: Study
Retrons Help Bacteria Defend Themselves from Phages: Study
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2021
The mysterious DNA sequences appear to help bacterial cells spot when they’ve been infected with viruses—and prompt those cells to self-destruct.
Watch a Plastid Squirm from One Plant Cell to Another
Watch a Plastid Squirm from One Plant Cell to Another
The Scientist Staff | Jan 8, 2021
Entire organelles bearing DNA move between strains of tobacco that were grafted to one another.
The Biggest Science News of 2020
The Biggest Science News of 2020
Kerry Grens | Dec 23, 2020
Neanderthal DNA surprises in modern humans, the first blood test for Alzheimer’s, a discovery of new human salivary glands, and, oh yeah, a pandemic
2020 in Pictures
2020 in Pictures
Amanda Heidt | Dec 18, 2020
This year yielded stunning images of transparent human organs, apex predators, and the world’s response to the ongoing pandemic.
Those We Lost in 2020
Those We Lost in 2020
Amanda Heidt | Dec 18, 2020
The scientific community bid farewell to researchers who furthered the fields of molecular biology, virology, sleep science, and immunology, among others.
New Protocol Advances Toward Lab-Made Universal Red Blood Cells
New Protocol Advances Toward Lab-Made Universal Red Blood Cells
Diana Kwon | Dec 17, 2020
Researchers report a new way of generating the cells from induced pluripotent stem cells in hopes they will one day be used in blood transfusions.