Green frog in tree with green leaves
For Frogs, Bigger Brains Mean Worse Camouflage
Frogs invest in cognitive capacity to avoid predators—up until there are too many hungry snakes around for the evolutionary strategy to pay off.
For Frogs, Bigger Brains Mean Worse Camouflage
For Frogs, Bigger Brains Mean Worse Camouflage

Frogs invest in cognitive capacity to avoid predators—up until there are too many hungry snakes around for the evolutionary strategy to pay off.

Frogs invest in cognitive capacity to avoid predators—up until there are too many hungry snakes around for the evolutionary strategy to pay off.

paper-based tests, ecology, cell & molecular biology
Countless bats swarming in the evening dusk
Bat Coronaviruses May Infect Tens of Thousands of People Yearly
Andy Carstens | Aug 10, 2022
Parts of Southeast Asia where human and bat population densities are highest could be infection hotspots, a study finds.
Calm lake reflecting sky with boat in foreground
Plastic Pollution Boosts Bacterial Growth in Lake Water
Patience Asanga | Jul 26, 2022
A study finds that not only did aquatic bacteria thrive when chemicals washed from degrading plastic were introduced into lake water, they also broke down organic matter more efficiently.
The advantages of 3-D cell culture
The Advantages of 3-D Cell Culture
MilliporeSigma
3-D cell culture narrows the gap between in vitro and in vivo.
Fluorescent cells in culture connected by tunneling nanotubules
SARS-CoV-2 Could Use Nanotubes to Infect the Brain
Natalia Mesa | Jul 21, 2022
Stressed cells can form hollow actin bridges to neighbors to get help, but the virus may hijack these tiny tunnels for its own purposes, a study suggests.
Vicu&ntilde;as <em>(Lama vicugna)</em> run across the plains in San Guillermo National Park, Argentina.
How Mange Remade an Ecosystem
Shawna Williams | Jul 5, 2022
A study traces the effects of a mite outbreak from the earth to the heavens.
Why might cells die or fail to thrive in culture?
Why Might Cells Die or Fail to Thrive in Culture?
MilliporeSigma
Learn more about cell culture best practices.
Single filament of a bacterium<br><br>
The Naked Eye Can Spy This Enormous Bacterium
Andy Carstens | Jun 24, 2022
At about 2 centimeters in length, Thiomargarita magnifica tests scientists’ notions of how large microbes can grow.
teabag with green tag on a white background
Spilling the Tea: Insect DNA Shows Up in World’s Top Beverage
Shawna Williams | Jun 14, 2022
The Scientist speaks with Trier University’s Henrik Krehenwinkel, whose group recently detected traces of hundreds of arthropod species from a sample of dried plants—in this case, the contents of a tea bag.
Peering into the Cell
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Researchers visualize the beautiful inner world of cells!
Ribbon weed meadow in Shark Bay, Western Australia
World’s Largest Organism Discovered Underwater
Andy Carstens | Jun 2, 2022
Off the western Australian coast, in Shark Bay, a field of seagrass big enough to cover Washington, DC, has flourished for more than four millennia, a new study finds.
Image of not-to-scale renderings of the skulls of various primate species
Surface Area of Tooth Roots Predicts Primate Body Size
Maddie Bender | May 2, 2022
Researchers determine that a primate’s tooth root, and not just its crown, can yield reliable information about body size, but the relationship between root surface area and diet isn’t as clear.
Modern Approaches to qPCR
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Download this ebook to learn how updated qPCR instruments provide optimal thermal performance and data connectivity!
Photo of a North American caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in Jasper National Park in Canada
Dozens of Genes Tied to Caribou’s Seasonal Migration
Maddie Bender | May 2, 2022
Researchers tracked the movements of endangered caribou and sequenced a portion of their genomes to determine which genes may influence migratory behavior.
leatherback sea turtle making its way across a beach
Fifteen-Year Project Quantifies Threat to Reptiles
Shawna Williams | Apr 28, 2022
The study estimates that one-fifth of reptile species worldwide are at risk of extinction.
Gene Therapy Workflow from Production to Quality Control
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Learn about some instruments used in gene therapy production.
Close-up of a fiber with brightly colored pathogens beside it
Microplastics in Seawater May Harbor Parasites
Christie Wilcox | Apr 26, 2022
Laboratory experiments find that Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Giardia can congregate on microplastic beads and fibers, suggesting they might make their way into and around the world’s oceans by hitching rides on tiny bits of trash.
A landscape showing a forest that’s been cleared to make room for a farm.
Climate Change and Agriculture Together Halve Insect Populations
Dan Robitzski | Apr 21, 2022
Insect populations and species diversity are drastically reduced in areas affected by both climate change and agriculture-related habitat destruction, according to a new study.
Investigating the Immune Response Using Advanced Flow Cytometry
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Discover how researchers are using flow cytometry to delve into the inner workings of the immune life cycle!
A headshot of Matthew Gage
Evolutionary Ecologist Matthew Gage Dies at 55
Amanda Heidt | Apr 20, 2022
The University of East Anglia researcher was best known for his contributions to the study of sexual selection, particularly post-copulatory sperm competition.