Identical Twins Accumulate Genetic Differences in the Womb
Identical Twins Accumulate Genetic Differences in the Womb
DNA replication errors during cell division cause monozygotic twins to diverge from each other even during the earliest stages of development, a new study finds.
Identical Twins Accumulate Genetic Differences in the Womb
Identical Twins Accumulate Genetic Differences in the Womb

DNA replication errors during cell division cause monozygotic twins to diverge from each other even during the earliest stages of development, a new study finds.

DNA replication errors during cell division cause monozygotic twins to diverge from each other even during the earliest stages of development, a new study finds.

para-aminosalicylic acid, developmental biology, ecology
Why Fish Don’t Exist TS Book Club Discussion
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Jan 28, 2021
Join The Scientist on March 19 to discuss Lulu Miller’s book about a determined taxonomist whose life and work constitute a fable illustrating the hazards of categorization.
Kathryn Anderson, forward genetics, genetics & genomics, model organisms, Toll, hedgehog, embryogenesis, developmental biology, cell differentiation, cilia,
Developmental Biologist Kathryn Anderson Dies at 68
Amanda Heidt | Jan 6, 2021
The Sloan Kettering researcher used mutagenic screening to probe genes and molecular pathways, including Toll and Hedgehog, essential to development in fruit flies and mice.
Celine Frere Chases Dragons and Koalas to Learn How They Adapt
Max Kozlov | Jan 1, 2021
The biologist at the University of Sunshine Coast in Australia wants to understand why some animal species adapt well to urbanization, while others fall flat.
Slideshow: Solving a Gray Whale Murder Mystery
Ashley Yeager | Nov 12, 2020
One way to investigate the record-setting deaths of the marine mammals is to perform autopsies on them, but researchers are also taking a close look at living whales for clues to what could be killing them.
model organism, zebrafish, sponge, cell &molecular biology, genetics & genomics, enhancer, transcription, non-coding DNA, gene regulation, evolution
Regulators of Gene Activity in Animals Are Deeply Conserved
Amanda Heidt | Nov 6, 2020
Enhancers, short regions of DNA that direct gene expression, of species separated by 700 million years of evolution worked interchangeably, according to a new study.
Can Rewilding Large Predators Regenerate Ecosystems?
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2020
As some conservationists and researchers begin to return large carnivores to areas where they once roamed, scientists intensify efforts to study the ecological roles of predators.
Slideshow: How Ecologists Study the World’s Apex Predators
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2020
A global decline of large carnivores has motivated scientists to understand the animals’ ecological roles, and consider whether reintroducing them can help restore ecosystems.
Tropical Birds Differ in Their Responses to Drought
Shawna Williams | Nov 1, 2020
Long-lived species decrease their reproduction more than short-lived species in response to lower-than-normal precipitation, and thereby gain a survival advantage, a study finds.
Infographic: Herbivore Dung Nutrients Vary Across the Savanna
Catherine Offord | Nov 1, 2020
In South Africa, the composition of droppings varies by species’ body sizes, and which animals are found where depends on vegetation density.
Infographic: Investigating Whale Strandings Along the North American Coast
Ashley Yeager | Nov 1, 2020
Knock-on effects of melting sea ice in the Arctic may be to blame for a spate of gray whale deaths along their migration route from Mexico to Alaska.
Clues Point to Climate Change as a Culprit in Gray Whale Deaths
Ashley Yeager | Nov 1, 2020
For the past two years, the charismatic marine mammals have washed up on Pacific shores in record numbers. Scientists investigating the strandings suspect warming waters and melting sea ice are partly to blame.
Infographic: How Large Carnivores Sculpt Ecosystems
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2020
The release of gray wolves in Yellowstone decades ago still stands as one of the few examples of a predator reintroduction, and the lessons learned continue to be debated. New projects aim to do it again.
Chelsea Wood Tracks Parasites Around the World
Amanda Heidt | Nov 1, 2020
The University of Washington parasite ecologist aims to understand how humans have changed the diversity and abundance of the enigmatic and misunderstood organisms.
Conservation Biology Icon Georgina Mace Dies at 67
Lisa Winter | Oct 2, 2020
Mace led the work to determine the criteria for the IUCN’s Red List.
Pandemic Shutdown Altered Bay Area Birdsongs
Ruth Williams | Sep 24, 2020
As shelter-in-place orders quieted the city of San Francisco, its sparrow population developed softer, sexier songs.
an old wooden barn near charred grassland
Field Research Sites Damaged as Fires Ravage West Coast
Shawna Williams | Sep 11, 2020
Flames and smoke have killed dozens of people over the past month and burned hundreds of thousands of acres, causing massive disruptions.
Infographic: Anatomical Construction by Cell Collectives
Michael Levin | Sep 1, 2020
Understanding this complex and still largely enigmatic process will pave the way for researchers to control the development of new morphologies.
How Groups of Cells Cooperate to Build Organs and Organisms
Michael Levin | Sep 1, 2020
Understanding biology’s software—the rules that enable great plasticity in how cell collectives generate reliable anatomies—is key to advancing tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
elephant herbivore extinction risk predator omnivore iucn red list
Risk of Extinction Is Greatest for Large Herbivores: Study
Ruth Williams | Aug 5, 2020
Data on vertebrate species that have become, or are likely to become, extinct reveal plant eaters are most under threat.