PCR, cell & molecular biology, microbiology
Microbiome Teams Up Against <em>C. diff</em>
Microbiome Teams Up Against C. diff
Jef Akst | Jul 14, 2015
Researchers build a mathematical model that can predict whether a mouse will be infected by Clostridium difficile based on the microbes found in its GI tract.
Evolution of Kin Discrimination
Evolution of Kin Discrimination
Ashley P. Taylor | Jul 6, 2015
A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.
Gutless Worm
Gutless Worm
The Scientist Staff | Jul 1, 2015
Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.
Sponging Up Phosphorus
Sponging Up Phosphorus
Jenny Rood | Jul 1, 2015
Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.
Sold on Symbiosis
Sold on Symbiosis
Anna Azvolinsky | Jul 1, 2015
A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.
The Sum of Our Parts
The Sum of Our Parts
Janice Dietert, Rodney Dietert | Jul 1, 2015
Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.
Regenerative Cardiomyocytes Found
Regenerative Cardiomyocytes Found
Kerry Grens | Jun 24, 2015
Specialized cardiac cells in the mouse heart appear to be the long-sought-after proliferative heart cells.
Extra DNA Base Discovered
Extra DNA Base Discovered
Jef Akst | Jun 23, 2015
An epigenetic variant of cytosine is stable in the genomes of living mice, suggesting a possible expansion of the DNA alphabet.
The Handedness of Cells
The Handedness of Cells
Kerry Grens | Jun 17, 2015
Actin—the bones of the cell—has a preference for swirling into a counterclockwise pattern.
Touchy Feely
Touchy Feely
Kerry Grens | Jun 1, 2015
Physical contact helps determine who’s present among baboons’ gut bacteria.