Giant manta ray swimming
Science Snapshot: Giant Manta Ray Sanctuary
Tourist photos help identify endangered manta rays and highlight the efficacy of recovery efforts at Komodo National Park.
ABOVE: Nick Longfellow
Science Snapshot: Giant Manta Ray Sanctuary
Science Snapshot: Giant Manta Ray Sanctuary

Tourist photos help identify endangered manta rays and highlight the efficacy of recovery efforts at Komodo National Park.

Tourist photos help identify endangered manta rays and highlight the efficacy of recovery efforts at Komodo National Park.

ABOVE: Nick Longfellow

photography, ecology, disease & medicine, infectious disease, conservation

Grey and white image of transmission electron tomography of monkeypox virus
US Case Adds to Unusual Monkeypox Outbreak
Natalia Mesa | May 19, 2022
Experts are scrambling to understand clusters of the normally rare disease that have been reported in Europe and North America in the last month.
A mosquito sucks blood from human skin
Malaria Mosquitoes Bite More During the Day Than Previously Thought
Andy Carstens | May 17, 2022
While malaria control strategies have focused on mosquitoes’ nocturnal activity, almost one-third of bites occur while the sun is up, a new study estimates.
iStock
To Conserve and Protect: The Quest for Universal Vaccines
Niki Spahich, PhD | May 24, 2022
Patrick Wilson discusses the challenges in designing universal vaccines and his work developing one for influenza.
Infographic about SLiMs in SARS-CoV-2 Infection
Infographic: Short Protein Motifs’ Role in SARS-CoV-2 Infection
Conchita Fraguas Bringas , Jakob Nilsson | May 16, 2022
Known as SLiMs, these stretches of up to 10 amino acids play notable roles in cell biology, including responses to viral invasion.
Conceptual image of coronavirus, SARS?Cov?2 infects a human cell
Viruses Target Super-Short Protein Motifs to Disrupt Host Biology
Conchita Fraguas Bringas , Jakob Nilsson | May 16, 2022
Only recently appreciated as critical components of cellular functions, unstructured stretches of amino acids called SLiMs are key to viral-host interactions.
Don Ingber discusses how organ-on-a-chip technology helps identify, study, and combat viral variants that could cause the next pandemic.
The Scientist Speaks - Preventing the Next Pandemic with Organ Chips
Nele Haelterman, PhD | Mar 30, 2022
Don Ingber discusses how organ-on-a-chip technology helps identify, study, and combat viral variants that could cause the next pandemic.
Image of a juvenile vaquita
Science Snapshot: Down but Not Out
Lisa Winter | May 6, 2022
Inbreeding depression won’t bring the 10 remaining vaquitas to extinction.
Image of not-to-scale renderings of the skulls of various primate species
Surface Area of Tooth Roots Predicts Primate Body Size
Maddie Bender | May 2, 2022
Researchers determine that a primate’s tooth root, and not just its crown, can yield reliable information about body size, but the relationship between root surface area and diet isn’t as clear.
Salmonella living within macrophages can survive antibiotic treatment and potentially give rise to resistance by two different mechanisms that slow or arrest their growth.
Bacteria Go Dormant to Survive Antibiotics and Restart Infections
Niki Spahich, PhD | Mar 7, 2022
In Salmonella, two seemingly similar antibiotic survival strategies result from very different molecular mechanisms.
Photo of a North American caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in Jasper National Park in Canada
Dozens of Genes Tied to Caribou’s Seasonal Migration
Maddie Bender | May 2, 2022
Researchers tracked the movements of endangered caribou and sequenced a portion of their genomes to determine which genes may influence migratory behavior.
leatherback sea turtle making its way across a beach
Fifteen-Year Project Quantifies Threat to Reptiles
Shawna Williams | Apr 28, 2022
The study estimates that one-fifth of reptile species worldwide are at risk of extinction.
The Power of ChipCytometry™? Multiplexing
Seeing is Believing: The Power of ChipCytometry™  Multiplexing
The Scientist Creative Services Team, Canopy Biosciences | Feb 22, 2022
J. Spencer Schwarz discusses how ChipCytometry™ Spatial Multiplexing Technology advances spatial biology research
Close-up of a fiber with brightly colored pathogens beside it
Microplastics in Seawater May Harbor Parasites
Christie Wilcox | Apr 26, 2022
Laboratory experiments find that Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Giardia can congregate on microplastic beads and fibers, suggesting they might make their way into and around the world’s oceans by hitching rides on tiny bits of trash.
A landscape showing a forest that’s been cleared to make room for a farm.
Climate Change and Agriculture Together Halve Insect Populations
Dan Robitzski | Apr 21, 2022
Insect populations and species diversity are drastically reduced in areas affected by both climate change and agriculture-related habitat destruction, according to a new study.
Discover Genetic Influences on the Immune Response
The Genetics Behind Immune Response Variability
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Jan 31, 2022
Researchers seek genomic clues to understand differences in the immune response to infection.
A headshot of Matthew Gage
Evolutionary Ecologist Matthew Gage Dies at 55
Amanda Heidt | Apr 20, 2022
The University of East Anglia researcher was best known for his contributions to the study of sexual selection, particularly post-copulatory sperm competition.
bat flying in front of tan building
Fruit Bats Echolocate During the Day Despite Having Great Vision
Natalia Mesa | Apr 20, 2022
Contrary to what researchers had assumed, Egyptian fruit bats don’t rely solely on sight to orient themselves as they drink and forage for food in daylight. 
Molecular Farming: The Future of Pharmaceuticals
The Scientist Speaks - Molecular Farming: The Future of Pharmaceuticals
Niki Spahich, PhD | Nov 16, 2021
Julian Ma discusses past, present, and future uses of plant biotechnology for disease treatments.
Gasteranthus extinctus, a plant with bright orange flowers and deep green leaves
Science Snapshot: Not “Extinctus” After All
Lisa Winter | Apr 19, 2022
Assumed to have gone extinct more than 30 years ago, Gasteranthus extinctus has been rediscovered by scientists working in Ecuador.