“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas
“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas
The color morph’s bright yellow hue and its propensity for skin tumors both likely stem from a gene implicated in a dangerous form of human skin cancer, suggesting the animals could make an ideal model for studying the disease.
“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas
“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas

The color morph’s bright yellow hue and its propensity for skin tumors both likely stem from a gene implicated in a dangerous form of human skin cancer, suggesting the animals could make an ideal model for studying the disease.

The color morph’s bright yellow hue and its propensity for skin tumors both likely stem from a gene implicated in a dangerous form of human skin cancer, suggesting the animals could make an ideal model for studying the disease.

physiology
Endocrinologist Jean Wilson Dies at 88
Endocrinologist Jean Wilson Dies at 88
Lisa Winter | Jun 24, 2021
The University of Texas Southwestern professor’s research focused on the androgen hormones that cause male sexual differentiation and may also lead to prostate disease.
Special Straw May Be Reliable Cure for Hiccups: Study
Special Straw May Be Reliable Cure for Hiccups: Study
Stephanie Melchor | Jun 21, 2021
The device helps control diaphragm contractions, preventing hiccup-causing muscle spasms.
A Newly Found Organ for <em>Arabidopsis</em>
A Newly Found Organ for Arabidopsis
Kerry Grens | Jun 16, 2021
Horizontal arms dubbed cantils only appear under certain growing conditions—perhaps explaining why they had not been identified before.
Skin Rash May Point to SARS-CoV-2 Infection
Skin Rash May Point to SARS-CoV-2 Infection
Roni Dengler, PhD | Jun 14, 2021
Skin symptoms are often the first, or only, symptom of COVID-19.
Nobel Laureate Richard Ernst Dies at 87
Nobel Laureate Richard Ernst Dies at 87
Lisa Winter | Jun 11, 2021
The chemist refined nuclear magnetic resonance technology, giving rise to the development of MRI.
Rotifers Bounce Back After Being Frozen for 24,000 Years
Rotifers Bounce Back After Being Frozen for 24,000 Years
Lisa Winter | Jun 8, 2021
The hardy animals were pulled from the permafrost in Siberia, giving scientists the opportunity to study how they survive extreme conditions.
Infographic: Pathways from Noise to Cardiovascular Damage
Infographic: Pathways from Noise to Cardiovascular Damage
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Research in mice and humans points to oxidative stress and inflammation as likely drivers of noise-induced health effects such as hypertension and heart disease.
Broken Heart Syndrome Linked to the Brain
Broken Heart Syndrome Linked to the Brain
Amanda Heidt | Jun 1, 2021
A chronically stressed amygdala can prime the heart to overreact to acute stress events, a new study shows.
How Environmental Noise Harms the Cardiovascular System
How Environmental Noise Harms the Cardiovascular System
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Sound from cars, aircraft, trains, and other man-made machines is more than just annoying. It increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
Blind Patient Recovers Partial Vision with Optogenetics
Blind Patient Recovers Partial Vision with Optogenetics
Alejandra Manjarrez | May 24, 2021
After receiving an intraocular injection of the gene for a light-sensitive protein, a 58-year-old man diagnosed with the neurodegenerative eye disease retinitis pigmentosa was able to locate objects on a table using engineered goggles.
Mammals Can Use Their Intestines to Breathe
Mammals Can Use Their Intestines to Breathe
Abby Olena | May 14, 2021
Researchers show that both mice and pigs are capable of oxygenating their blood via the colon—a capacity that, if shared by humans, could be leveraged in the clinic to minimize the need for mechanical ventilation.
Blood Biomarkers Predict the Onset of Labor: Study
Blood Biomarkers Predict the Onset of Labor: Study
Abby Olena | May 6, 2021
Researchers integrated information from 45 protein, metabolite, and immune data points to identify a window two to four weeks before a pregnant person will go into labor.
Spleen-to-Liver Signals Control Systemic Inflammation
Spleen-to-Liver Signals Control Systemic Inflammation
Ruth Williams | Apr 29, 2021
In rats, the spleen directs a cytokine surge that drives system-wide inflammation, but it is not, as once believed, the main producer of the chemical messenger.
No Proof COVID-19 Vaccine Affects Menstruation or Fertility
No Proof COVID-19 Vaccine Affects Menstruation or Fertility
Lisa Winter | Apr 27, 2021
Following vaccination, some women claim their periods have changed, leading to rumors about how the shots affect recipients’ reproductive systems, and even others’ by proxy.  
Cones Derived from Human Stem Cells Help Mice See: Study
Cones Derived from Human Stem Cells Help Mice See: Study
Marcus A. Banks | Apr 23, 2021
Researchers insert functioning cone photoreceptors into the retinas of mice with advanced eye disease, improving their vision.
Regular HIIT Exercise Enhances Health via Histamine
Regular HIIT Exercise Enhances Health via Histamine
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Apr 21, 2021
Men given high doses of two antihistamine drugs did not experience the same benefits of high intensity interval training that men on a placebo enjoyed, revealing some of the molecular underpinnings of exercise’s effect.
NIH Reverses Limits on Human Fetal Tissue Research
NIH Reverses Limits on Human Fetal Tissue Research
Amanda Heidt | Apr 19, 2021
A new ruling removes the requirement that grants and proposals using the material receive approval from an ethical review board, reverting to the process in place before 2019.
Mysterious Immune Cells Change the Gut Lining to Accommodate Diet
Mysterious Immune Cells Change the Gut Lining to Accommodate Diet
Stephanie Melchor | Apr 6, 2021
A study shows gamma-delta T cells in mice respond to shifts in nutrients by changing the cellular composition of the intestinal epithelium.
High Stress Hormone Levels Halt Mouse Fur Growth
High Stress Hormone Levels Halt Mouse Fur Growth
Jef Akst | Apr 1, 2021
Corticosterone interferes with signaling in the skin that normally activates hair follicle stem cells, possibly explaining the link between stress and hair loss.