physiology, neuroscience, immunology
How Moral Disgust Can Simultaneously Protect and Endanger Humanity
How Moral Disgust Can Simultaneously Protect and Endanger Humanity
Robert Sapolsky | Jun 1, 2017
The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.
Running on Empty
Running on Empty
Bob Grant | Jun 1, 2017
Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.
Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land
Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land
Ee Ling Ng | Jun 1, 2017
Contamination of marine and terrestrial ecosystems by microplastics is putting individual organisms at risk.
Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>
Book Excerpt from Behave
Robert Sapolsky | May 31, 2017
In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.
Brain Freeze
Brain Freeze
The Scientist Staff | May 31, 2017
Meet one child saved from brain damage by cooling therapy.
Infographic: A Body Without FoodInfographic: A Body Without Food
Infographic: A Body Without Food
Bob Grant | May 31, 2017
Mounting evidence suggests that intermittent fasting causes significant changes to various organs and tissue types.
Infographic: Immune Irritation in the Gut
Infographic: Immune Irritation in the Gut
Catherine Offord | May 31, 2017
A look at how gluten affects patients with celiac disease
Infographic: Plastics’ Effects
Infographic: Plastics’ Effects
Ee Ling Ng | May 31, 2017
Lab studies suggest that plastic pollutants in the environment could have detrimental effects on animals’ physiology.
Entire Fruit Fly Brain Imaged with Electron Microscopy
Entire Fruit Fly Brain Imaged with Electron Microscopy
Ashley Yeager | May 31, 2017
Synaptic connections and a new neuron type emerge in high-res images, which hold promise for mapping the complete connectome.
Karl Deisseroth Takes Home Science’s Most Valuable Award
Karl Deisseroth Takes Home Science’s Most Valuable Award
Jef Akst | May 31, 2017
The Stanford University psychiatrist and neuroscientist known for his contributions to optogenetics and tissue clearing is awarded €4 million by the Fresenius Research Prize.