products, genetics & genomics, ecology, neuroscience
Resolving Chronic Pain
Claudia Sommer and Frank Birklein | Jan 1, 2012
The body’s own mechanism for dispersing the inflammatory reaction might lead to new treatments for chronic pain.
Top Ten Innovations 2011
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2012
Our list of the best and brightest products that 2011 had to offer the life scientist
Capsule Reviews
Richard P. Grant | Jan 1, 2012
Our Dying Planet, Here Be Dragons, Rat Island, Harnessed
Inflammation, Pain, and Resolvins
Inflammation, Pain, and Resolvins
Claudia Sommer and Frank Birklein | Jan 1, 2012
Not all inflammation leads to pain. Despite widespread infection followed by fever, colds rarely cause pain. But when some cytokines and certain immune cells are active near pain-sensing nerves, they trigger receptors that convey pain sensations to the brain.
Cat Cravings
Cat Cravings
Jef Akst | Jan 1, 2012
A mutated feline receptor for sweet tastes explains why cats don’t love sugar but do dig mushrooms.
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2012
Meet some of the people featured in the January 2012 issue of The Scientist.
High-Tech Choir Master
High-Tech Choir Master
Karen Hopkin | Jan 1, 2012
Elaine Mardis can make DNA sequencers sing, generating genome data that shed light on evolution and disease.
2011's Best and Brightest
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2012
In its brief, 4-year history, The Scientist’s annual Top 10 Innovations contest has become a showcase of the coolest life science tools to emerge in the previous year. 
Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s
Sabrina Richards | Jan 1, 2012
How Nobel Laureate Barbara McClintock nearly gave up genetics for meteorology
Speaking of Science
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2012
January 2012's selection of notable quotes