proteins, microbiology, developmental biology
Image of the Day: Ant Attack!
Image of the Day: Ant Attack!
The Scientist Staff | Apr 24, 2018
A new species of ant discovered in Borneo fends off invaders with a uniquely suicidal strategy.
Image of the Day: Cell Droplets
Image of the Day: Cell Droplets
The Scientist Staff | Apr 4, 2018
Proteins and RNA aggregate into “membraneless organelles” due to liquid-liquid phase separation.
Image of the Day: New Neurons
Image of the Day: New Neurons
The Scientist Staff | Mar 28, 2018
Scientists discover a molecular factor that allows them to follow neurons from birth to maturity.
Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full
Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full
Catherine Offord | Mar 28, 2018
Baby frogs don’t develop the neural circuitry responsible for feeding inhibition until they begin metamorphosing into adults. 
Image of the Day: Morphing Cells
Image of the Day: Morphing Cells
The Scientist Staff | Mar 27, 2018
By removing a single gene, researchers change the developmental fate of tumor cells in mice.  
Image of the Day: Flock of Algae
Image of the Day: Flock of Algae
The Scientist Staff | Mar 21, 2018
Volvox barberi actively organize themselves into large colonies that optimize space.
Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria
Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria
Catherine Offord | Mar 20, 2018
A new study finds that more than 200 human-targeted, non-antibiotic drugs inhibit the growth of bacterial species that make up part of the human microbiome.
Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics
Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics
Ruth Williams | Mar 15, 2018
A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  
Image of the Day: Living Color
Image of the Day: Living Color
The Scientist Staff | Mar 8, 2018
Biodegradable pigments could be custom-grown by bacteria in the future, say researchers.  
Slime Mold in Residence
Slime Mold in Residence
Ashley P. Taylor | Mar 2, 2018
At Hampshire College, students and faculty use the amoeba Physarum polycephalum—both a “visiting scholar” and a model organism—to examine human societal and political quandaries.