A scanning electron micrograph of a human fetal gut, pseudocolored in yellow and blue
Microbes in Human Fetuses Spur Immune Development
Researchers identify live bacteria in fetal guts, skin, lungs, and placentas that activate memory T cells, indicating that early exposure to microbes could help educate the developing immune system.
Microbes in Human Fetuses Spur Immune Development
Microbes in Human Fetuses Spur Immune Development

Researchers identify live bacteria in fetal guts, skin, lungs, and placentas that activate memory T cells, indicating that early exposure to microbes could help educate the developing immune system.

Researchers identify live bacteria in fetal guts, skin, lungs, and placentas that activate memory T cells, indicating that early exposure to microbes could help educate the developing immune system.

protozoans, disease & medicine, immunology
A black line drawing of a mother putting a face mask on a child with a white background
SARS-CoV-2 Antigens Leaking from Gut to Blood Might Trigger MIS-C
Alejandra Manjarrez | Jun 3, 2021
Researchers find traces of SARS-CoV-2 in the stool and blood of kids with the post–COVID-19 inflammatory disorder, and signs of increased intestinal permeability.
The Psychology of Panic
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The recent news of consumers hoarding gasoline in the face of a brief closure of one of the world’s biggest petroleum pipelines is just the latest episode of panic buying since the COVID-19 pandemic started.
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Infographic: Pathways from Noise to Cardiovascular Damage
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Research in mice and humans points to oxidative stress and inflammation as likely drivers of noise-induced health effects such as hypertension and heart disease.
Mucosal Vaccines Protect Mice from Viruses, Cancer
Emma Yasinski | Jun 1, 2021
Scientists use a protein found in mucus membranes to ferry vaccines to the lymph nodes.
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jun 1, 2021
Meet some of the people featured in the June 2021 issue of The Scientist.
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How Environmental Noise Harms the Cardiovascular System
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Sound from cars, aircraft, trains, and other man-made machines is more than just annoying. It increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
Opinion: Comparing Coronaviruses
Nicola Petrosillo | Jun 1, 2021
In addition to continued scruitiny of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, research on similar pathogens could aid in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic and future disease outbreaks.
A hospital corridor with empty gurney
Severe Symptoms of MIS-C Typically Clear Within Six Months: Study
Catherine Offord | May 26, 2021
Some children who experience the severe inflammatory condition after COVID-19 may continue to experience milder problems such as muscle weakness or anxiety even after that period, according to a small observational study in the UK.
A stylized, computer-generated 3D render of a virus cell that looks similar to SARS-CoV-2
Two New Coronaviruses Make the Leap into Humans
Amanda Heidt | May 20, 2021
Two viruses from dogs and pigs were isolated from human patients, but neither was proven to cause severe disease or to transmit to other people.
US and Chinese flags
Ohio State Researcher Sentenced to Prison for Secret China Ties
Lisa Winter | May 17, 2021
Rheumatologist Song Guo Zheng pleaded guilty in November to delivering US-funded research to China.
Close-up shot of smooth cauliflower polyps
Comprehensive Atlas of Reef-Building Coral’s Cells Created
Christie Wilcox | May 13, 2021
Single-cell RNA sequencing helps to catalog the dozens of cell types present in a stony coral, including its elusive immune cells.
Transmission electron microscope image of Zika virus particles
T Cell–Boosting Zika Vaccine Protects Mice from the Virus
Ruth Williams | May 12, 2021
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An illustration of a DNA double helix in gold with texture
Gene Therapy Continues to Benefit Kids with Immunodeficiency
Jef Akst | May 12, 2021
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