quantitative PCR, microbiology, evolution
Week in Review: October 17–21
Week in Review: October 17–21
Jef Akst | Oct 21, 2016
Report finds that pathologist involved in anonymous defamation case committed multiple acts of misconduct; growing eggs from stem cells; neutrophils’ role in metastasis; convergent evolution in birds
Single-Celled Life Primed to Go Multicellular
Single-Celled Life Primed to Go Multicellular
Bob Grant | Oct 17, 2016
The unicellular ancestor of animals may have harbored some of the molecular tools that its many-celled descendants use to coordinate and direct cell differentiation and function, scientists show.
Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea
Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea
Ruth Williams | Oct 12, 2016
Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.
To Attract Pollinators, Flower Mimics Wounded Bee
To Attract Pollinators, Flower Mimics Wounded Bee
Ben Andrew Henry | Oct 7, 2016
Umbrella flowers lure in flies by mimicking the alarm signals produced by the flies’ preferred prey.
Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia
Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia
Kelly Robinson and Julie Dunning Hotopp | Oct 1, 2016
Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?
Life Scientists Receive “Genius” Grants
Life Scientists Receive “Genius” Grants
Ben Andrew Henry | Sep 22, 2016
Among this year’s 23 MacArthur Foundation Fellows are pioneering biologists.
How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
Ruth Williams | Sep 20, 2016
Caffeine-producing plants use three different biochemical pathways and two different enzyme families to make the same molecule.
Stingrays Chew Too
Stingrays Chew Too
Ben Andrew Henry | Sep 15, 2016
Researchers observe stingrays moving their jaws to grind up prey, a behavior thought to be restricted to mammals.
Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma
Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma
Anna Azvolinsky | Sep 12, 2016
Byproducts of gut microbes in some 1-month–old babies trigger inflammation that is linked to later asthma development, researchers find.
Week in Review: September 5–9
Week in Review: September 5–9
Jef Akst | Sep 9, 2016
Environmental magnetite in the human brain; prion structure takes shape; watching E. coli evolve in real time; learning from others’ behavior