Octopus in tank lined with black dots
Do Invertebrates Have Emotions?
And how do scientists go about answering that question?
ABOVE: Robyn Crook
Do Invertebrates Have Emotions?
Do Invertebrates Have Emotions?

And how do scientists go about answering that question?

And how do scientists go about answering that question?

ABOVE: Robyn Crook

research ethics

Photo of John Calhoun crouches within his rodent utopia-turned-dystopia
Universe 25, 1968–1973
Annie Melchor | May 2, 2022
A series of rodent experiments showed that even with abundant food and water, personal space is essential to prevent societal collapse.
People holding signs
NYU Defends Against Backlash Over Potential Hire
Amanda Heidt | Apr 29, 2022
Hundreds of the school’s faculty, students, and trainees are protesting its consideration of David Sabatini, who left his previous posts after alleged sexual misconduct.
Smartphone with thumb over twitter icon
UK Funding Agency Apologizes for Role in Researchfish Controversy
Natalia Mesa | Apr 20, 2022
Researchfish is a platform commonly used to track the status of grants and the impacts of research. When academics were critical of the company online, Researchfish shared these comments with the largest funding agency in the UK, and the scientists’ comments were sometimes shared with their employers.
Zebrafish with fluorescent nervous system in green.
Oust the Mouse: A Plan to Reduce Mammal Use in Drug Development
Natalia Mesa | Mar 15, 2022
The Scientist spoke to Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory’s Jim Strickland about the institute’s new MDI Bioscience initiative to perform more drug testing and development in nonmammalian models.
A Theranos sign outside the company's headquarters
Theranos Founder Elizabeth Holmes Convicted of Fraud
Amanda Heidt | Jan 4, 2022
After a week of deliberation, a jury returned a guilty verdict on four charges related to wire fraud, each of which carries a maximum sentence of up to 20 years in prison.
mummy
Scratchy Scalps Help Glue Together Pieces of an Ancient Past
Chloe Tenn | Dec 29, 2021
Scientists find human DNA preserved in lice cement from the heads of South American mummies.
university building
Harvard Chemist Found Guilty of Lying About Chinese Funding
Chloe Tenn | Dec 22, 2021
In a win for the US Department of Justice’s China Initiative, Charles Lieber was convicted of hiding his financial ties to China from federal agencies.
Hela cells colored in blue
Henrietta Lacks Estate Sues Thermo Fisher over HeLa Cell Line
Catherine Offord | Oct 4, 2021
Attorneys for the family seek compensation for the company’s sale of cells cloned from tissue removed without consent by doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital 70 years ago.
a gavel with a pipet and wellplate
Elisabeth Bik Faces Legal Action After Criticizing Studies
Shawna Williams | May 28, 2021
A complaint lodged by researchers in France prompts two petitions supporting Bik’s whistleblowing work.
EXCLUSIVE
Assorted pills and tablets
Frontiers Pulls Special COVID-19 Issue After Content Dispute
Catherine Offord | Apr 28, 2021
The issue’s guest editors resign after falling out with the publisher over the management of papers, including a rejected manuscript on ivermectin, that were submitted for a special issue on drug repurposing for COVID-19.
Opinion: Facing Assumptions About the Duality of Human and Animal
Melanie Challenger | Apr 1, 2021
Since Darwin published his landmark work on natural selection, we’ve understood that we’re animals. But that doesn’t mean we really believe it.
José Baselga, cancer, research, oncology, AstraZeneca, breast cancer, drugs, therapeutics, obituary, dies
José Baselga, Renowned Oncologist, Dies at 61
Asher Jones | Mar 22, 2021
The cancer researcher and executive vice president of AstraZeneca’s oncology research and development is well known for his role in the development of pivotal breast cancer therapies.
coral reef, Great barrier reef, parachute science, research
Q&A: Parachute Science in Coral Reef Research
Asher Jones | Feb 24, 2021
Scientists who study the marine ecosystems have frequently failed to involve local researchers in projects, a study finds.
Steps to End “Colonial Science” Slowly Take Shape
Ashley Yeager | Jan 1, 2021
Scientists from countries with fewer resources are pushing collaborators from higher-income countries to shed biases and behaviors that perpetuate social stratification in the research community.
A Challenge Trial for COVID-19 Would Not Be the First of Its Kind
Jef Akst | Oct 8, 2020
Although scientists debate the ethics of deliberately infecting volunteers with SARS-CoV-2, plenty of consenting participants have been exposed to all sorts of pathogens in prior trials.
Scientist as Subject
Amanda Heidt | Oct 1, 2020
In the past, it was not uncommon for researcher to test their experimental therapeutics and vaccines on themselves. Some even volunteered to be exposed to pathogen-carrying vectors.
vaccine, Covid-19, coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, pandemic, self experimentation, polio, poliovirus, yellow fever, Jonas Salk, Joseph Goldberger, George Church
Self-Experimentation in the Time of COVID-19
Amanda Heidt | Aug 6, 2020
Scientists are taking their own vaccines, an ethically murky practice that has a long and sometimes celebrated history in medicine.
a gloved hand holds a vial labeled "SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, COVID-19"
Support for Vaccine Challenge Trials Gains Momentum
Shawna Williams | May 11, 2020
The idea of deliberately infecting volunteers with SARS-CoV-2 has garnered significant attention as a potential avenue to speedier development, as the World Health Organization weighs in with recommendations.
Bioethicists Criticize WHO’s Malaria Vaccine Trial
Lisa Winter | Feb 28, 2020
The study, conducted in Malawi, Kenya, and Ghana, did not obtain informed consent from each parent whose child participated, but rather considered consent “implied” because of the particular experimental design.