retraction watch, culture, developmental biology, immunology
Ten-Minute Sabbatical
Ten-Minute Sabbatical
The Scientist Staff | Jun 1, 2018
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
Image of the Day: Agar Art
Image of the Day: Agar Art
Sukanya Charuchandra | May 30, 2018
The American Society for Microbiology held its 4th contest for images created from microorganisms feeding on agar. 
Another Retraction for Discredited Researcher
Another Retraction for Discredited Researcher
Jim Daley | May 25, 2018
Robert Ryan was forced to resign from the University of Dundee in 2016 following an investigation of misconduct.
What Made Human Brains So Big?
What Made Human Brains So Big?
Ashley Yeager | May 24, 2018
Ecological challenges such as finding food and creating fire may have led the organ to become abnormally large, a new computer model suggests.
Animals’ Embryonic Organizer Now Discovered in Human Cells
Animals’ Embryonic Organizer Now Discovered in Human Cells
Jim Daley | May 23, 2018
The finding confirms that a cluster of cells that directs the fate of other cells in the developing embryo is evolutionarily conserved across the animal kingdom.
Genetic Screen Predicts T-Cell Lymphoma Aggression
Genetic Screen Predicts T-Cell Lymphoma Aggression
Kerry Grens | May 9, 2018
Sequencing of a single gene can spot patients with a dangerous form of mycosis fungoides better than other prognostic tests.  
NIH Plans to Enroll 1 Million People for Health Database
NIH Plans to Enroll 1 Million People for Health Database
Catherine Offord | May 3, 2018
The agency says it has taken various steps to ensure the privacy of participants’ data. 
Study Explains How Newborn Mice Can Regrow Damaged Hearts
Study Explains How Newborn Mice Can Regrow Damaged Hearts
Ruth Williams | May 2, 2018
The extracellular matrix appears to inhibit regeneration; but scientists debate whether heart muscle really comes back.  
Image of the Day: Swiss Army Crustacean
Image of the Day: Swiss Army Crustacean
The Scientist Staff | May 2, 2018
The tools researchers used to study how this amphipod’s limbs develop could help inform our understanding of cell lineages and fates.
Colorblindness Study Reveals Unexpected Way to Make Blood Vessels
Colorblindness Study Reveals Unexpected Way to Make Blood Vessels
Ashley Yeager | May 1, 2018
Researchers stumbled across the connection while searching for ways to reduce vision problems in people with achromatopsia.