science education, developmental biology, microbiology, evolution
Why People Lost Their Fur
Ruth Williams | Dec 12, 2011
The need for ancient humans to keep cool during the day might explain their lack of body hair but not why they walked on two feet.
Arsenic Bug's Genome Sequenced
Bob Grant | Dec 7, 2011
Researchers have mapped out the DNA of what some scientists claim to be an arsenic loving bacterium.
Brain Evolution at a Distance
Hannah Waters | Dec 6, 2011
Gene expression controlled from afar may have spurred the spurt in brain evolution that led to modern humans.
Top 7 in Ecology
Bob Grant | Dec 6, 2011
A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in ecology, from Faculty of 1000
Resistance Outlasts Antibiotics
Edyta Zielinska | Dec 5, 2011
Antibiotic resistant bacteria keep their protective genes, even when antibiotics are no longer given.
Stem Cells Traced To Heart
Tia Ghose | Dec 1, 2011
New research suggests that a controversial class of stem cells originates in the heart and retains some ability to repair damaged tissue.
Astronaut Worms Return from Space
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2011
After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.
Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2011
Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42
Eye of Newt
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.
Newts' New Eyes
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery.