Octopus in tank lined with black dots
Do Invertebrates Have Emotions?
And how do scientists go about answering that question?
ABOVE: Robyn Crook
Do Invertebrates Have Emotions?
Do Invertebrates Have Emotions?

And how do scientists go about answering that question?

And how do scientists go about answering that question?

ABOVE: Robyn Crook

speciation, Human Genome Project, chimpanzee, animal behavior

Salamander on log
Science Snapshot: Free Fallin’ Salamanders
Lisa Winter | May 26, 2022
Arboreal salamanders use skydiving techniques to avoid smashing to the ground after a fall.
two muskoxen headbutting
Muskoxen Headbutts May Cause Brain Damage: Study
Patience Asanga | May 25, 2022
Researchers report molecular evidence of traumatic brain injury in headbutting animals, but other experts aren’t convinced.
A school of juvenile spiny chromis (Acanthochromis polycanthus)
Human-Made Noise Disrupts Fish Parenting
Christie Wilcox | May 23, 2022
The roar of nearby boat engines alters how fish care for and protect their young, resulting in fewer successful nests and smaller offspring, a study finds.
Two adult bottlenose dolphins and one calf swim close to a sandy seafloor that’s dotted with coral.
Study Suggests Dolphins Use Coral Mucus as Medicine
Dan Robitzski | May 19, 2022
Researchers observe that dolphins in a pod in the Red Sea regularly rub against certain corals and sponges, perhaps to sooth their skin by prompting the invertebrates to release mucus that contains antimicrobial compounds.
Two bonobos facing each other on a tree branch
Q&A: In Battle of the Sexes, Dominance Doesn’t Always Equal Power
Raegan Scharfetter | May 18, 2022
The Scientist spoke to hyena researcher Eve Davidian for a broad look at power relationships between male and female mammals.
brown spotted octopus blending in with its background
Steroids May Explain Octopuses’ Self-Starvation
Andy Carstens | May 16, 2022
Two glands increase steroid production after female California two-spot octopuses mate, a study finds. Those hormones may be responsible for the animals’ self-destructive behavior.
An illustration showing a scale weighing two double-stranded pieces of DNA that has a big question mark in the center.
Mouse Foraging Behavior Shaped by Opposite-Sex Parent’s Genes
Dan Robitzski | Apr 12, 2022
A study in mice finds that for certain genes, one parent’s allele can dominate expression and shape behavior—and which parent’s allele does so varies throughout the body.
Photo of a Dwarf mongoose
Dwarf Mongooses Shun Bullies to Manage Conflict: Study
Mary Bates | Apr 4, 2022
These social animals keep tabs on aggressive members of the group and groom them less after fights to punish them.
Vole in a meadow
Voles Trim Tall Grass to Prevent Attacks
Natalia Mesa | Mar 14, 2022
Mongolian rodents join the ranks of earthworms and beavers as known ecosystem engineers.
Equid burial from Umm el-Marra, Syria
Caught on Camera
The Scientist Staff | Mar 14, 2022
Selected images from the-scientist.com
an Australian magpie stares down the camera
Altruism in Birds? Magpies Have Outwitted Scientists by Helping Each Other Remove Tracking Devices
Dominique Potvin | Feb 22, 2022
It was the first time a bird has removed a tracking device, and the second time a bird species showed cooperative “rescue” behavior.
Deborah Nickerson
Genome Pioneer Deborah Nickerson Dies at 67
Amanda Heidt | Feb 9, 2022
The University of Washington researcher leveraged data from the Human Genome Project to identify genes underlying various health conditions and advance precision medicine.
One chimpanzee grooming another on its chin
Chimps Appear to Treat Others' Wounds Using Insects
Natalia Mesa | Feb 7, 2022
The practice, which hasn’t been previously observed among nonhuman animals, may be a display of empathy. 
Man in black suit looking at camera
Pioneering Geneticist C. Thomas Caskey Dies at 83
Natalia Mesa | Jan 28, 2022
Caskey’s contributions to the field were instrumental to modern genetics.
Variety of sweeteners - Stevia, sugar, pollen and honey stock photo
How the Gut Differentiates Artificial Sweeteners from Sugars
Chloe Tenn | Jan 21, 2022
Signals from sweeteners and sugars are relayed from the gut to the brain by different neural pathways, a new study concludes.
Photo of Roxanne Beltran
Roxanne Beltran Dives into Seal Research
Lisa Winter | Jan 17, 2022
This University of California, Santa Cruz, biologist is dedicated to her marine mammal research, as well as to making the field more diverse and equitable.
Photo of krill and plankton in the sea, macro detail
Fear Could Help Explain the Behavior of Animals in the Ocean
Catherine Offord | Jan 4, 2022
Avoidance of predation is a driving force behind the daily movements of marine creatures across the food web, a study concludes.
a microscope image of mouse fur
Some Mammals May Use Specialized Hairs to Detect Predators’ Heat
Amanda Heidt | Dec 16, 2021
When observed under a microscope, guard hairs from mice resemble optical sensors used in thermal cameras to detect heat, according to a new study.
Cute sleeping newborn baby child on mother hands stock photo
Exposure to Chemical from Babies Linked to Aggression
Chloe Tenn | Nov 22, 2021
A study finds that the odorless compound hexadecanal, or HEX, increases aggressive behavior in women but has a calming effect on men.