stress, cell & molecular biology
Obesogens
Obesogens
Kerry Grens | Nov 1, 2015
Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.
Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link
Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link
Laura W. Bowers, Stephen D. Hursting, Ciara H. O’Flanagan | Nov 1, 2015
Obese people are at higher risk for developing cancer, have worse prognoses once diagnosed, and are often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The question is, Why?
A Complex Disorder
A Complex Disorder
Stephen D. Hursting, Ciara H. O’Flanagan, Laura W. Bowers | Nov 1, 2015
Factors that likely contribute to obesity include disruptions to intercellular signaling, increased inflammation, and changes to the gut microbiome.
 
Fat Factors
Fat Factors
Kerry Grens | Nov 1, 2015
A mouse's exposure to certain environmental chemicals can lead the animal—and its offspring and grandoffspring—to be overweight.
Not Immune to Fat
Not Immune to Fat
Kate Yandell | Nov 1, 2015
The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells
Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate
Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate
Kerry Grens | Oct 27, 2015
Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.
Antioxidants May Aid Cancer
Antioxidants May Aid Cancer
Kerry Grens | Oct 16, 2015
Mice given a dietary supplement had faster-progressing melanoma, a study shows.
Growing Placenta-Generating Cells
Growing Placenta-Generating Cells
Jef Akst | Oct 14, 2015
Researchers derive trophoblast stem cells from mouse fibroblasts, paving the way for cell therapy for placental dysfunction diseases.
Explaining Elephants’ Cancer Resistance
Explaining Elephants’ Cancer Resistance
Jef Akst | Oct 13, 2015
Two studies reveal that the giant mammals have dozens of extra copies of a cancer-preventing gene.
Scientists Skip Cell Line Validation
Scientists Skip Cell Line Validation
Kerry Grens | Oct 12, 2015
Despite known problems with contamination and mislabeled cell lines, most researchers continue to operate without authenticating cells’ identity.