Man in lab coat looking at camera and smiling
Can Taking a Test Now Tell You if You’ve Already Had COVID-19?
The Scientist asks Brigham and Women’s Hospital infectious disease specialist Lindsey Baden about testing for prior infections.
Can Taking a Test Now Tell You if You’ve Already Had COVID-19?
Can Taking a Test Now Tell You if You’ve Already Had COVID-19?

The Scientist asks Brigham and Women’s Hospital infectious disease specialist Lindsey Baden about testing for prior infections.

The Scientist asks Brigham and Women’s Hospital infectious disease specialist Lindsey Baden about testing for prior infections.

ABOVE: Credit: Len Rubenstein
structural biology, disease & medicine, immunology
Artist&rsquo;s rendition of multiple <em>Neisseria gonorrhoeae</em>, the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, depicted as two spheres stuck together, each covered in tendrils.
Gonorrhea-Blocking Mutation Also Protects Against Alzheimer’s: Study
Holly Barker | Aug 5, 2022
Research traces the evolution of a gene variant that reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, finding that it originally evolved in response to infectious bacteria.
Photo of Makio Murayama
Handmade Hemoglobin, 1912-2012
Dan Robitzski | Aug 1, 2022
Makio Murayama, a Japanese-American biochemist who was turned away from the Manhattan Project due to his heritage, rose to prominence for his work uncovering the link between the structure of hemoglobin and the mechanisms of sickle cell disease.
A New Multiplexed SARS-CoV-2 Serological Assay Using Advanced Flow Cytometry
A New Multiplexed SARS-CoV-2 Serological Assay Using Advanced Flow Cytometry
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Aug 9, 2022
Julie Lovchik will discuss how advanced flow cytometry instrumentation facilitates multiplex assessment of IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies against SARS-CoV-2.
Infographic showing how neurodegenerative diseases have long been associated with aggregations of apparently toxic proteins
Infographic: Secret Lives of Neurodegeneration-Linked Proteins
Catherine Offord | Aug 1, 2022
Maligned peptides such as the Alzheimer’s-associated amyloid precursor protein may have critical roles in the healthy brain.
Ribbon diagram of the protein coat of an adeno-associated virus
Preprints Propose Constellation of Causes for Kids’ Liver Disease
Christie Wilcox | Jul 25, 2022
Two independent groups suggest the suite of recent unexplained hepatitis cases may stem from coinfection with an adeno-associated virus and a helper adeno- or herpesvirus, a duo which may be especially virulent in children with a particular genetic variant.
in love with the shape of you
In Love with the Shape of You: Physical Scaffolding Defines Organoid Patterning
Sejal Davla, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Controlling a growing tissue’s shape achieves deterministic and uniform patterning in intestinal organoids.
A single neutrophil white blood cell in the artery with red blood cells floating around it
Missing Y Chromosome in Mouse Blood Causes Heart Dysfunction
Patience Asanga | Jul 16, 2022
An analysis of human data from the UK biobank also finds an association between Y chromosome loss and heart disease in men.
map showing Tanzania
Unidentified Bleeding Disease Kills Three in Tanzania
Andy Carstens | Jul 15, 2022
Thirteen people with the illness have tested negative for Ebola and Marburg. The Tanzanian government continues to investigate the source.
COVID-19 vaccine vials
COVID-19 Vaccines Induce Better Long-Term Immunity than Infection
Jennifer Zieba, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
For the first time, researchers performed a head-to head longitudinal study comparing the immune response elicited by mRNA and traditional COVID-19 vaccines to primary infections.
white squiggles on black background
Opinion: Manuscripts and Art Support Archaeological Evidence that Syphilis Was in Europe Long Before Explorers Could Have Brought It Home from the Americas
Marylynn Salmon | Jul 13, 2022
Multiple lines of evidence contradict the idea that the disease came to Europe via trans-Atlantic exchange.
illustration of inside of gut with floating bacteria
Finding Could Pave the Way to New, Targeted Antibody Treatments
Natalia Mesa | Jul 8, 2022
IgA antibodies appear to bind to specific species of commensal gut bacteria in mice, according to a study.
A person holding a section of his face and looking in to his brain through a magnifying glass stock illustration
Science Philosophy in a Flash - A Look at Aging Through Young Eyes 
Iris Kulbatski, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Aimée Parker shares how her childlike curiosity and collaborative spirit motivate her scientific pursuits.
thin, rubbery-looking band with squiggly black channels running through it
Tiny Nerve-Cooling Implant Relieves Pain in Rats
Shafaq Zia | Jul 1, 2022
The device can chill nerves as small as a few millimeters across, but more testing and modifications are necessary before it could relieve pain in humans.
An orange-brown pineapple sea cucumber, covered in wart-like growths, rests on the seafloor in front of some coral, with a school of fish swimming overhead.
How the Sea Cucumber Defends Itself . . . From Itself
Natalia Mesa | Jul 1, 2022
The marine animals have evolved a unique molecular pathway enabling them to use toxins to fight off invaders without poisoning themselves in the process.
An abstract stained-glass portrait of a woman with an image of an eye representing the brain
Through the Looking Glass: Aging, Inflammation, and Gut Rejuvenation
Iris Kulbatski, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Renewing the aging gut microbiome holds promise for preventing inflammatory brain and eye degeneration.
A section of a mouse distal colon showing luminal contents with bacteria in magenta, the mucus lining (green) and the epithelial cell barrier of the gut (blue, right).
Mapping the Neighborhoods of the Gut Microbiome
Abby Olena | Jul 1, 2022
Researchers are going beyond fecal samples to understand how the patterns of commensal microbes in the gastrointestinal tract influence development and health.
Photo taken from the perspective of a lab worker in a white coat and purple gloves preparing multiple fecal transplant capsules at a time.
Banking Previous Poos: Could a Transplant of Feces from Your Past Heal You?
Dan Robitzski | Jun 30, 2022
The Scientist spoke with Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School researchers Scott Weiss and Yang-Yu Liu, who propose that people bank stool samples when they’re young and healthy so that they can be transplanted to rejuvenate the gut microbiome later on.
Motor neurons, undergoing degeneration in ALS
Mutant T Cells That Drive Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Progression May React To a Brain Antigen
Nele Haelterman, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Scientists discovered a possibly autoreactive T cell population that forecasts and supports disease progression.
Artist&rsquo;s rendering of aquamarine T cells in front of a blue and green background.
Study Links Stress to a Faster-Aging Immune System
Margaret Osborne | Jun 21, 2022
Health data from 5,744 adults over the age of 50 reveals an association between stressors such as discrimination and a relatively small proportion of younger infection-fighting immune cells.