survey, developmental biology, evolution
High-Flying Ducks
High-Flying Ducks
Sarah Hewitt | Jul 1, 2015
Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.
How to Make a New Species
How to Make a New Species
Ruth Williams | Jul 1, 2015
Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.
Roos Are Mainly South Paws
Roos Are Mainly South Paws
Bob Grant | Jun 22, 2015
A new study shows that kangaroos are predominantly left-handed.
Spider and Centipede Venom Remarkably Similar
Spider and Centipede Venom Remarkably Similar
Bob Grant | Jun 12, 2015
The predatory toxins employed by animals separated by millions of years of evolution are virtually identical, a study shows.
Sperm From Ovaries
Sperm From Ovaries
Anna Azvolinsky | Jun 11, 2015
With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 
Tippling Chimps Caught in the Act
Tippling Chimps Caught in the Act
Bob Grant | Jun 10, 2015
Researchers in Africa observe chimpanzees stealing palm wine from villagers’ cups and imbibing the beverage.
Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered
Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered
Bob Grant | Jun 8, 2015
Dubbed “Hellboy,” the triceratops relative sports a bevy of horns on its crested cranium.
Capsule Reviews
Capsule Reviews
Bob Grant | Jun 1, 2015
How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind
Book Excerpt from <em>The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack</em>
Book Excerpt from The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack
Ian Tattersall | Jun 1, 2015
In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.
Reimagining Humanity
Reimagining Humanity
Ian Tattersall | Jun 1, 2015
As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.