techniques, evolution, disease & medicine
Inherited Intelligence
Inherited Intelligence
Ruth Williams | Jul 10, 2014
Cognitive testing in chimpanzee pedigrees reveals a genetic basis for intelligence.
Lichen Legion
Lichen Legion
Jyoti Madhusoodanan | Jul 2, 2014
Genetic analysis splits one species into 126.
The Rise of Color
The Rise of Color
Jef Akst | Jul 1, 2014
An analysis of modern birds reveals that carotenoid-based plumage coloring arose several times throughout their evolutionary history, dating as far back as 66 million years ago.
Bird’s-Eye Proteomics
Bird’s-Eye Proteomics
Asher Mullard | Jul 1, 2014
A guide to mass spectrometers that can handle the top-down-proteomics challenge
The Sooner, The Better
The Sooner, The Better
Nicholette Zeliadt | Jul 1, 2014
New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.
Geni-Tales
Geni-Tales
Menno Schilthuizen | Jul 1, 2014
Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.
 
Size Matters
Size Matters
Tracy Vence | Jul 1, 2014
The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.
Carnal Knowledge
Carnal Knowledge
Bob Grant | Jul 1, 2014
Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.
The Sex Paradox
The Sex Paradox
Megan Scudellari | Jul 1, 2014
Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?
Sly Guys
Sly Guys
The Scientist Staff | Jul 1, 2014
Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.