top 10 innovations 2012, immunology, developmental biology, microbiology
Astronaut Worms Return from Space
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2011
After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.
Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2011
Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42
Eye of Newt
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.
Newts' New Eyes
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 
Flow Cytometry for the Masses
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.
Breaching the Wall
Rachel Nuwer | Dec 1, 2011
Editor’s choice in immunology
Bacterial Identity Crisis
Cristina Luiggi | Nov 9, 2011
Researchers probe the genetics of a group of bacteria known to extensively swap DNA sequences with other species—blurring the species boundaries.
Genome Digest
Cristina Luiggi | Nov 2, 2011
Meet the species whose DNA has recently been sequenced.
How Probiotic Yogurt Works
Bob Grant | Oct 26, 2011
Researchers show that the bacterial species in probiotic, fermented dairy products may alter gene expression and metabolism in native gut microbiota.
Bird Flu Vax Spurs Virus Evolution
Edyta Zielinska | Oct 21, 2011
Inadequate poultry immunization programs may cause higher mutations rates in the bird flu virus, rendering the vaccine ineffective and increasing the threat of cross-species transmission.