transcription, disease & medicine
Monitoring Post-Mortem Gene Transcription in Mice and Zebrafish
Monitoring Post-Mortem Gene Transcription in Mice and Zebrafish
Joshua A. Krisch | Jan 26, 2017
Genes linked to embryonic development, stress, and cancer are increasingly transcribed into RNA after these animals die.
Infographic: Examining Open Chromatin
Infographic: Examining Open Chromatin
Ruth Williams | Dec 31, 2016
See how researchers visualize regions of active genes.
Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus
Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus
Andr├ę Hoelz, Daniel H. Lin | Dec 1, 2016
Solving a long-standing structural puzzle will open the door to understanding one of the cell’s most enigmatic machines.
Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons
Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons
Karen Zusi | Oct 1, 2016
Some ciliates use the same trio of nucleotides to code for an amino acid and to stop translation.
How to Track Translation in Living Cells
How to Track Translation in Living Cells
Ruth Williams | Oct 1, 2016
Four independent research groups develop techniques for visualizing peptide production in living cells.
Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants
Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants
Karen Zusi | Sep 30, 2016
Traditional stop codons have a double meaning in the protozoans' mRNA, sometimes calling for an amino acid during translation.
Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators
Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators
Ruth Williams | Aug 1, 2016
Researchers have designed a screen to find unique molecules, called riboswitches, that determine whether transcription will proceed.
Riboswitch Screen
Riboswitch Screen
Ruth Williams | Jul 31, 2016
A newly developed method detects regulators of bacterial transcription called riboswitches.
Exercise Boosts Telomere Transcription
Exercise Boosts Telomere Transcription
Anna Azvolinsky | Jul 27, 2016
Endurance exercise and metabolism are linked to transcriptional activation of human telomeres, researchers propose.
Research at Micro- and Nanoscales
Research at Micro- and Nanoscales
Mary Beth Aberlin | Jun 1, 2016
From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.