Countless bats swarming in the evening dusk
Bat Coronaviruses May Infect Tens of Thousands of People Yearly
Parts of Southeast Asia where human and bat population densities are highest could be infection hotspots, a study finds.
Bat Coronaviruses May Infect Tens of Thousands of People Yearly
Bat Coronaviruses May Infect Tens of Thousands of People Yearly

Parts of Southeast Asia where human and bat population densities are highest could be infection hotspots, a study finds.

Parts of Southeast Asia where human and bat population densities are highest could be infection hotspots, a study finds.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, RALF LIEBHOLD
tumor, ecology
black-and-white brain scan showing tumor
Glioblastoma Cells Imitate Immature Neurons to Invade the Brain
Sophie Fessl | Aug 5, 2022
Neuron-like glioblastoma cells are the pioneers of deadly tumors’ spread through the brain, contributing to their devastating invasiveness, a study in mice finds.
Calm lake reflecting sky with boat in foreground
Plastic Pollution Boosts Bacterial Growth in Lake Water
Patience Asanga | Jul 26, 2022
A study finds that not only did aquatic bacteria thrive when chemicals washed from degrading plastic were introduced into lake water, they also broke down organic matter more efficiently.
Overcoming T Cell Therapy Barriers with Engineered Proteins
Overcoming T Cell Therapy Barriers with Engineered Proteins
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Jul 13, 2022
Shannon Oda will discuss how to develop novel engineered fusion proteins to improve T cell therapies against hematological and solid tumors.
Vicu&ntilde;as <em>(Lama vicugna)</em> run across the plains in San Guillermo National Park, Argentina.
How Mange Remade an Ecosystem
Shawna Williams | Jul 5, 2022
A study traces the effects of a mite outbreak from the earth to the heavens.
teabag with green tag on a white background
Spilling the Tea: Insect DNA Shows Up in World’s Top Beverage
Shawna Williams | Jun 14, 2022
The Scientist speaks with Trier University’s Henrik Krehenwinkel, whose group recently detected traces of hundreds of arthropod species from a sample of dried plants—in this case, the contents of a tea bag.
3-D image of a tumor
Cancer Cells Go Incognito to Cause Therapy Relapse
Niki Spahich, PhD | Jun 27, 2022
Dormant cancer cells and dysfunctional immune cells living together in a tumor niche form a therapy-resistant reservoir.
Ribbon weed meadow in Shark Bay, Western Australia
World’s Largest Organism Discovered Underwater
Andy Carstens | Jun 2, 2022
Off the western Australian coast, in Shark Bay, a field of seagrass big enough to cover Washington, DC, has flourished for more than four millennia, a new study finds.
salmonella bacteria 3d illustration
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors
Dan Robitzski | May 16, 2022
Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.
Identifying Biomarkers to Guide Cancer Immunotherapy
Identifying Biomarkers to Guide Cancer Immunotherapy
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Mar 15, 2022
An expert panel will discuss the cutting-edge technologies they used to identify novel biomarkers that predict patient responses to immunotherapy.
Illustration showing how following radiation therapy, which triggers the release of cancer-specific antigens, researchers injected Salmonella typhimurium bacteria covered in positively charged nano- particles near tumors in mice.
Infographic: Salmonella Shuttle Tumor Antigens to Immune Cells
Dan Robitzski | May 16, 2022
Nanoparticle-coated bacteria carry cancer-derived proteins to dendritic cells, enabling the immune system to launch a response in a mouse model.
Image of not-to-scale renderings of the skulls of various primate species
Surface Area of Tooth Roots Predicts Primate Body Size
Maddie Bender | May 2, 2022
Researchers determine that a primate’s tooth root, and not just its crown, can yield reliable information about body size, but the relationship between root surface area and diet isn’t as clear.
Finding CAR T Cells in Solid Tumors by Single-Cell Resolution
Finding CAR T Cells in Solid Tumors at Single-Cell Resolution
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Miltenyi Biotec | Nov 12, 2021
Rita Pfeifer will discuss visualizing and quantifying CAR T-cell infiltration into solid tumors with 3-D light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM).
Photo of a North American caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in Jasper National Park in Canada
Dozens of Genes Tied to Caribou’s Seasonal Migration
Maddie Bender | May 2, 2022
Researchers tracked the movements of endangered caribou and sequenced a portion of their genomes to determine which genes may influence migratory behavior.
leatherback sea turtle making its way across a beach
Fifteen-Year Project Quantifies Threat to Reptiles
Shawna Williams | Apr 28, 2022
The study estimates that one-fifth of reptile species worldwide are at risk of extinction.
Undone Proteins Take Out Bladder Cancer
Roni Dengler, PhD | Jul 20, 2021
An unfolded protein found in human milk shows promise in early clinical trials to treat bladder cancer.
Close-up of a fiber with brightly colored pathogens beside it
Microplastics in Seawater May Harbor Parasites
Christie Wilcox | Apr 26, 2022
Laboratory experiments find that Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Giardia can congregate on microplastic beads and fibers, suggesting they might make their way into and around the world’s oceans by hitching rides on tiny bits of trash.
A landscape showing a forest that’s been cleared to make room for a farm.
Climate Change and Agriculture Together Halve Insect Populations
Dan Robitzski | Apr 21, 2022
Insect populations and species diversity are drastically reduced in areas affected by both climate change and agriculture-related habitat destruction, according to a new study.
Advancing Cancer Biomarker Detection with Single Cell Proteomics
The Scientist Creative Services Team in Collaboration with IsoPlexis | May 31, 2021
An improved ELISA-based proteomics chip detects cytokines in single cell applications.
A headshot of Matthew Gage
Evolutionary Ecologist Matthew Gage Dies at 55
Amanda Heidt | Apr 20, 2022
The University of East Anglia researcher was best known for his contributions to the study of sexual selection, particularly post-copulatory sperm competition.