Human kidney in hands stock photo
Surgeons Successfully Transplant a Pig Kidney into a Person
The achievement bolsters hopes that nonhuman animals could be used to remedy the shortage of transplantable organs.
ABOVE: ISTOCK, PEPIFOTO
Surgeons Successfully Transplant a Pig Kidney into a Person
Surgeons Successfully Transplant a Pig Kidney into a Person

The achievement bolsters hopes that nonhuman animals could be used to remedy the shortage of transplantable organs.

The achievement bolsters hopes that nonhuman animals could be used to remedy the shortage of transplantable organs.

ABOVE: ISTOCK, PEPIFOTO

universal flu vaccine, immunology

A watercolor of a baby in a heart-shaped womb
Sex of Fetus Affects Immune Response to COVID-19 During Pregnancy
Amanda Heidt | Oct 20, 2021
Male placentas produce more proinflammatory molecules than female placentas, while people carrying male fetuses produce fewer antibodies in response to infection, a study finds.
white adult mouse with 4 pups on white background
Mice that Survive Infection Pass on Stronger Immunity
David Adam | Oct 18, 2021
Offspring of animals subjected to a real or simulated pathogen were more able to fend off disease, a study finds.
Molecular Farming: The Future of Pharmaceuticals
The Scientist Speaks - Molecular Farming: The Future of Pharmaceuticals
Niki Spahich, PhD | Nov 16, 2021
Julian Ma discusses past, present, and future uses of plant biotechnology for disease treatments.
illustration of a coronavirus and antibodies
When the Immune Response Makes COVID-19 Worse
Alejandra Manjarrez | Sep 27, 2021
If the immune system makes mistakes—reacting late or getting the target wrong—it can amplify the damage wrought by SARS-CoV-2.
moderna and pfizer vaccine vials
Moderna vs. Pfizer: Is There a “Best” mRNA Vaccine?
Alejandra Manjarrez | Sep 24, 2021
Both of the mRNA vaccines available in the US are highly effective against severe COVID-19, but recent studies suggest that Moderna’s elicits a stronger immune response and might be better at preventing breakthrough infections.  
800x560 istock image
Training Immune Cells to Be Cancer Killers
Aparna Nathan | Nov 12, 2021
A career-altering experience as a cancer patient motivated one researcher to design more potent immunotherapies.
Man sitting on bed with his head in his hands
NIH Grants $470 Million for Study of Long COVID
Lisa Winter | Sep 16, 2021
The study aims to recruit 40,000 adults and children to get a better sense of the condition that can last weeks or months after infection.
An illustration showing the damage SARS-CoV-2 wreaks on the body
Infographic: The Havoc SARS-CoV-2 Wreaks on the Body
Diana Kwon | Sep 1, 2021
COVID-19 affects far more than just the lungs. Researchers are actively documenting the damage the disease causes to the heart, brain, liver, and much more.
istock image 800x560
Can mRNA Vaccine Momentum Propel Tumor Immunotherapies?
Aparna Nathan | Nov 12, 2021
A guide to mRNA-based cancer vaccines and where they’re headed next
An image depicting where covid affects the body
SARS-CoV-2’s Wide-Ranging Effects on the Body
Diana Kwon | Sep 1, 2021
Researchers’ painstaking examinations have begun to reveal how the virus wreaks havoc in multiple organs and tissues.
Image of an abstract Earth view from space with fiber optic cables rising from major cities.
Delta Blues
Bob Grant | Sep 1, 2021
Humanity was hoping to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic this year. But viruses have plenty of tools at their disposal, and we should plan for a long-term future in which SARS-CoV-2 is a persistent threat.
Exploring the Transcriptome
Connecting the Transcriptome to the Functional Proteome of Single Cells Using a Novel Platform
The Scientist Creative Services Team in Collaboration with IsoPlexis | Nov 10, 2021
Rui Zheng and Patrick Paczkowski will discuss a new, highly multiplexed, simultaneous single cell transcriptomics and functional proteomics platform.
elongated blue bacterial cells on a reddish-brown background
Gut Microbiome May Help or Hinder Defenses Against SARS-CoV-2
Bianca Nogrady | Aug 31, 2021
The health of the microbial community is associated with COVID-19 severity, but it’s not yet clear if the relationship is causal.
Middle aged man with glasses wearing a blue shirt and tan blazer with a red paisley tie looking into the camera
Immunologist Thomas Hodge Dies of COVID-19 at 69
Lisa Winter | Aug 30, 2021
A former academic and consultant, Hodge cofounded the CrisiScience Collective to help combat the pandemic.
blood plasma
Trapped Inflammatory Molecules Contribute to Long COVID
Roni Dengler, PhD | Nov 9, 2021
Microclots in blood plasma may be behind Long COVID’s chronic symptoms.
illustration of a blue neuron lit with red
Neuron-Released Protein Can Set Off Inflammation: Study
Marcus A. Banks | Aug 19, 2021
Research in mice suggests that moderating nerve activity with drugs or electrical pulses could modify tissue immune responses, curtailing the chronic pain often associated with inflammatory conditions.
Infographic: Maternal Microbiota Has Lasting Effects on Offspring
Carolyn A. Thomson, Kathy D. McCoy | Aug 1, 2021
Work in rodents shows that the bacteria living in a mother’s gut can produce immunomodulatory metabolites and influence the production of maternal antibodies—both of which can affect her offspring’s development.
Discover new treatments for pandemic diseases
Treatments for Disease Pandemics
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Oct 29, 2021
Researchers develop new vaccines and therapeutics to combat the spread of infectious diseases.
The Role of Mom’s Microbes During Pregnancy
Carolyn A. Thomson, Kathy D. McCoy | Aug 1, 2021
Bacteria in the gut influence the production of antibodies and themselves secrete metabolites. In a pregnant woman, these compounds may influence immune development of her fetus.