violence, ecology, genetics & genomics
2011's Best and Brightest
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2012
In its brief, 4-year history, The Scientist’s annual Top 10 Innovations contest has become a showcase of the coolest life science tools to emerge in the previous year. 
Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s
Sabrina Richards | Jan 1, 2012
How Nobel Laureate Barbara McClintock nearly gave up genetics for meteorology
Speaking of Science
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2012
January 2012's selection of notable quotes
Magnetic Swimmers Cultured
Tia Ghose | Dec 22, 2011
For the first time, researchers culture a bacteria that uses a magnetic sulfide compound to navigate.
Video Gamers Help Solve Disease
Jef Akst | Dec 20, 2011
The collective intelligence of thousands of video game players is helping researchers understand the regulation of more than 500 different disease genes.
Monkeys Track Radiation
Edyta Zielinska | Dec 16, 2011
Scientists near the Fukushima plant are equipping wild monkeys with radiation collars to get better sense of their exposure in the wild.
Brightness of Buttercups
Edyta Zielinska | Dec 13, 2011
Researchers explain the luminous quality of yellow buttercups.
$400M for Personalized Medicine
Edyta Zielinska | Dec 8, 2011
The National Institutes of Health promises about $400 million to help get personalized genetics into the clinic.
Arsenic Bug's Genome Sequenced
Bob Grant | Dec 7, 2011
Researchers have mapped out the DNA of what some scientists claim to be an arsenic loving bacterium.
Top 7 in Ecology
Bob Grant | Dec 6, 2011
A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in ecology, from Faculty of 1000