Researcher fighting misinformation online
Twitter’s Science Stars Fight Misinformation
COVID-19 has thrown science and scientists into the spotlight. Some have accepted the challenge, amassing hundreds of thousands of followers and using the ongoing pandemic as a “teachable moment.”
ABOVE: modified from © istock.com, gmast3r
Twitter’s Science Stars Fight Misinformation
Twitter’s Science Stars Fight Misinformation

COVID-19 has thrown science and scientists into the spotlight. Some have accepted the challenge, amassing hundreds of thousands of followers and using the ongoing pandemic as a “teachable moment.”

COVID-19 has thrown science and scientists into the spotlight. Some have accepted the challenge, amassing hundreds of thousands of followers and using the ongoing pandemic as a “teachable moment.”

ABOVE: modified from © istock.com, gmast3r
work-life balance, careers, policy
Donald Caspar smiling into camera holding a buckyball model
Legendary Crystallographer Donald Caspar Dies At 94
Lisa Winter | Jan 7, 2022
He coined the term “structural biology.”
A Theranos sign outside the company's headquarters
Theranos Founder Elizabeth Holmes Convicted of Fraud
Amanda Heidt | Jan 4, 2022
After a week of deliberation, a jury returned a guilty verdict on four charges related to wire fraud, each of which carries a maximum sentence of up to 20 years in prison.
Shot of a young woman using a computer while working in a laboratory
Pandemic Amplifies Postdoc Struggles
Bianca Nogrady | Dec 28, 2021
Postdoctoral fellows faced challenges before COVID-19 changed the way academia functions, and these early career scientists report that things have only gotten harder.
university building
Harvard Chemist Found Guilty of Lying About Chinese Funding
Chloe Tenn | Dec 22, 2021
In a win for the US Department of Justice’s China Initiative, Charles Lieber was convicted of hiding his financial ties to China from federal agencies.
Lab with white walls, door, and two chairs with lab coats
MRC Lead Apologizes Following Bullying Allegations
Catherine Offord | Dec 17, 2021
In a statement issued by UK Research and Innovation, stem cell biologist Fiona Watt said she was devastated to learn of the impact of her actions and behavior on colleagues.
illustration of a laptop surrounded by data visualization plots
Opinion: In Defense of Preprints
Richard Sever, John Inglis | Nov 11, 2021
In response to two November 2021 articles in The Scientist that called out preprints as a source of medical misinformation, the cofounders of bioRxiv and medRxiv say it’s not the publishing model that’s at fault.
Hand drawing a red line between the UK and the rest of the European Union. Concept of Brexit.
How Brexit Is Transforming the UK’s STEM Community
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2021
Scientists face the ramifications of the country’s departure from the European Union, from delays in laboratory supplies to difficulties hiring international students and faculty.
student picket line strike
Harvard Student Strike a Warning to University
Chloe Tenn | Oct 29, 2021
Graduate students planned a three-day-long strike to demand fair pay, union security, and improved protections against sexual harassment and discrimination. If an agreement isn’t met, the union says they may strike longer, potentially disrupting university research.
Anonymous person covering face with question mark
Revealing Peer Reviewer Identities Could Introduce Bias: Study
Chloe Tenn | Oct 27, 2021
An analysis finds that reviewers are more likely to choose to be de-anonymized when their reviews are positive, suggesting instituting a fully open process might discourage negative feedback.
Sign that reads "University of Pittsburgh Founded 1787"
University of Pittsburgh Faculty Unionize
Lisa Winter | Oct 21, 2021
The faculty voted 1511 to 612 to affiliate with United Steelworkers.
NIH Director Francis Collins receiving his first dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine on December 2020.
Francis Collins to Retire as NIH Director by Year’s End
Christie Wilcox | Oct 5, 2021
Collins has announced his intent to step down after leading the National Institutes of Health for more than 12 years.
Photographs of the October 2021 issue's contributors
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Oct 1, 2021
Meet some of the people featured in the October 2021 issue of The Scientist.
Puzzle of US and Chinese flags
Opinion: Policymakers’ Harmful Anti-China Obsession
Christopher Tonnu Jackson | Sep 28, 2021
Justifying science funding through the lens of global competition risks fostering racial bias and discrimination.
Illustration of a female scientist on a laptop sitting on top a large pill capsule, with science-related imagery around her
Opinion: Scientists Must Combat Scientific Dogmatism
Ahmed Alkhateeb | Sep 23, 2021
Correcting misinformation and providing reliable data are collective responsibilities of the research community.
women-banner
NIH Changes Extension Policy to Better Support Women PIs
Chloe Tenn | Sep 20, 2021
The revision allows more time on previous extensions due to COVID-19 and other life events such as childbirth that disproportionately impact early-career women in science.  
Rhino upside down, in the sky
2021 Ig Nobel Prizes Honor Decongestant Orgasms, Rhino Transport
Lisa Winter | Sep 14, 2021
A full beard can absorb nearly 40 percent of the shock from a punch to the face, according to one winning study.
Updated Dec 22
Photograph of the US Food and Drug Administration’s sign outside their offices in Washington, D.C.
Lawmakers Request Information About Alzheimer’s Drug Approval
Annie Melchor | Sep 3, 2021
The FDA granted the drug, called Aduhelm, accelerated approval earlier this summer in a process that’s since drawn scrutiny.
Illustration of a person confused looking at a computer
When Researchers Sound the Alarm on Problematic Papers
Shawna Williams | Sep 1, 2021
Finding and reporting an irregularity in a published study can lead people down an unexpected path.