Some Barnacles Can Move Around to Improve Feeding Position
Some Barnacles Can Move Around to Improve Feeding Position
Chloe Tenn | Oct 6, 2021
The Scientist spoke with marine biologist and barnacle researcher John Zardus about why turtle barnacles—previously thought to be immobile—in fact slowly travel. He thinks the answer is food.
Numerosity Around the Animal Kingdom
Numerosity Around the Animal Kingdom
Catherine Offord | Oct 1, 2021
Research in recent decades has explored how animals other than humans perceive different numbers of objects
Hagfish Slime Cells Tailored to Deter Predation
Hagfish Slime Cells Tailored to Deter Predation
Chloe Tenn | Sep 28, 2021
The Scientist spoke with Chapman University’s Yu Zeng about his lab’s finding that the slime-producing cells of the slippery marine fish vary with the creature’s size, which may be an adaptation to thwart different predators.
Potty Party: Researchers Show Young Cows Can Be Toilet-Trained
Potty Party: Researchers Show Young Cows Can Be Toilet-Trained
Annie Melchor | Sep 14, 2021
Ethologist Jan Langbein and his team trained the cattle as a way to keep solid and liquid cattle waste separate—with the goal of reducing ammonia emissions coming from livestock.
2021 Ig Nobel Prizes Honor Decongestant Orgasms, Rhino Transport
2021 Ig Nobel Prizes Honor Decongestant Orgasms, Rhino Transport
Lisa Winter | Sep 14, 2021
A full beard can absorb nearly 40 percent of the shock from a punch to the face, according to one winning study.
Talking Duck Stuns Animal Behavior Researcher
Talking Duck Stuns Animal Behavior Researcher
Christie Wilcox | Sep 5, 2021
Leiden University’s Carel ten Cate tracked down 34-year-old duck recordings—and the man who made them—to verify that musk ducks are capable of vocal learning, an ability that hadn’t been thought to exist in waterfowl.
Shane Campbell-Staton Dissects the Anthropocene
Shane Campbell-Staton Dissects the Anthropocene
Lisa Winter | Sep 1, 2021
The Princeton University evolutionary biologist studies how animals are changing due to human activity.
Classroom Science Leads to Revision of Megalodon’s Size
Classroom Science Leads to Revision of Megalodon’s Size
Connor Lynch | Sep 1, 2021
A handful of high schoolers prompt scientists to develop a new approach for calculating the size of the ancient behemoth.
Fish Species’ Y Chromosomes Diverged Even Without Recombination
Fish Species’ Y Chromosomes Diverged Even Without Recombination
Catherine Offord | Sep 1, 2021
Researchers discover surprisingly high levels of genetic diversity among the colorful male morphs of a freshwater fish.
Baby Talk: Bat Pups Babble Like Human Infants
Baby Talk: Bat Pups Babble Like Human Infants
Annie Melchor | Aug 20, 2021
By studying the vocal behavior of 20 baby bats from birth to weaning, researchers have identified striking similarities between how young humans and bats develop communication skills.
Snakes on a Plain
Snakes on a Plain
Annie Melchor | Aug 19, 2021
Researchers discover that rattlesnakes change their rattling frequency when a perceived threat approaches—tricking humans into thinking the snake is closer than it really is.
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
Christie Wilcox | Aug 19, 2021
The Scientist spoke to marine biologist Tim Lynch, who dusted off 25-year-old data from his PhD to figure out why olive sea snakes approach divers so often. He says the animals, especially the males, likely confuse people for potential mates.
890-Million-Year-Old Fossils Are Sponges, Oldest Animals: Study
890-Million-Year-Old Fossils Are Sponges, Oldest Animals: Study
Abby Olena | Jul 28, 2021
If confirmed, the findings indicate that animals appeared on Earth millions of years earlier than previously believed.
A “Climate Catastrophe”: Western US Salmon on the Brink
A “Climate Catastrophe”: Western US Salmon on the Brink
Lisa Winter | Jul 27, 2021
A recent sampling from two California streams found nearly all juvenile salmon were infected with deadly parasites, and conditions are expected to worsen.
With Video
Australian Beetles Walk on the Underside of Water’s Surface
Australian Beetles Walk on the Underside of Water’s Surface
Lisa Winter | Jul 15, 2021
Watch one scurry around upside down in a remarkably unusual form of locomotion.
Tiny Hitchhikers Reveal Turtles’ Movements and Foraging Ecology
Tiny Hitchhikers Reveal Turtles’ Movements and Foraging Ecology
Amanda Heidt | Jul 13, 2021
Microscopic creatures called epibionts that live on sea turtles’ shells can help researchers understand their secretive lives.
Mice Plague Eastern Australia in Record Numbers
Mice Plague Eastern Australia in Record Numbers
Bianca Nogrady | Jul 12, 2021
A population explosion that began late last year has yet to abate. Meanwhile, researchers are exploring novel approaches to combat the nonnative species.
Screams Communicate Human Emotions
Screams Communicate Human Emotions
Phil Jaekl | Jul 1, 2021
A group of self-styled screamologists are sifting through the noisiness of nonverbal human vocalizations and finding previously undemonstrated forms of communication.
New Study Fuels Debate About Source of Birds’ Magnetic Sense
New Study Fuels Debate About Source of Birds’ Magnetic Sense
Catherine Offord | Jun 23, 2021
A detailed analysis of cryptochrome 4 shows that the protein is highly sensitive to magnetic fields in vitro, but some researchers dispute the authors’ assertion that the findings could help explain avian magnetoreception.
African Coelacanths May Live to Be 100: Study
African Coelacanths May Live to Be 100: Study
Catherine Offord | Jun 18, 2021
This evolutionarily ancient fish species has a lifespan that’s around five times longer than previously thought, and a gestation time of more than five years.