Classroom Science Leads to Revision of Megalodon’s Size
Classroom Science Leads to Revision of Megalodon’s Size
Connor Lynch | Sep 1, 2021
A handful of high schoolers prompt scientists to develop a new approach for calculating the size of the ancient behemoth.
Fish Species’ Y Chromosomes Diverged Even Without Recombination
Fish Species’ Y Chromosomes Diverged Even Without Recombination
Catherine Offord | Sep 1, 2021
Researchers discover surprisingly high levels of genetic diversity among the colorful male morphs of a freshwater fish.
Baby Talk: Bat Pups Babble Like Human Infants
Baby Talk: Bat Pups Babble Like Human Infants
Annie Melchor | Aug 20, 2021
By studying the vocal behavior of 20 baby bats from birth to weaning, researchers have identified striking similarities between how young humans and bats develop communication skills.
Snakes on a Plain
Snakes on a Plain
Annie Melchor | Aug 19, 2021
Researchers discover that rattlesnakes change their rattling frequency when a perceived threat approaches—tricking humans into thinking the snake is closer than it really is.
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
Christie Wilcox | Aug 19, 2021
The Scientist spoke to marine biologist Tim Lynch, who dusted off 25-year-old data from his PhD to figure out why olive sea snakes approach divers so often. He says the animals, especially the males, likely confuse people for potential mates.
890-Million-Year-Old Fossils Are Sponges, Oldest Animals: Study
890-Million-Year-Old Fossils Are Sponges, Oldest Animals: Study
Abby Olena | Jul 28, 2021
If confirmed, the findings indicate that animals appeared on Earth millions of years earlier than previously believed.
A “Climate Catastrophe”: Western US Salmon on the Brink
A “Climate Catastrophe”: Western US Salmon on the Brink
Lisa Winter | Jul 27, 2021
A recent sampling from two California streams found nearly all juvenile salmon were infected with deadly parasites, and conditions are expected to worsen.
With Video
Australian Beetles Walk on the Underside of Water’s Surface
Australian Beetles Walk on the Underside of Water’s Surface
Lisa Winter | Jul 15, 2021
Watch one scurry around upside down in a remarkably unusual form of locomotion.
Tiny Hitchhikers Reveal Turtles’ Movements and Foraging Ecology
Tiny Hitchhikers Reveal Turtles’ Movements and Foraging Ecology
Amanda Heidt | Jul 13, 2021
Microscopic creatures called epibionts that live on sea turtles’ shells can help researchers understand their secretive lives.
Mice Plague Eastern Australia in Record Numbers
Mice Plague Eastern Australia in Record Numbers
Bianca Nogrady | Jul 12, 2021
A population explosion that began late last year has yet to abate. Meanwhile, researchers are exploring novel approaches to combat the nonnative species.
Screams Communicate Human Emotions
Screams Communicate Human Emotions
Phil Jaekl | Jul 1, 2021
A group of self-styled screamologists are sifting through the noisiness of nonverbal human vocalizations and finding previously undemonstrated forms of communication.
New Study Fuels Debate About Source of Birds’ Magnetic Sense
New Study Fuels Debate About Source of Birds’ Magnetic Sense
Catherine Offord | Jun 23, 2021
A detailed analysis of cryptochrome 4 shows that the protein is highly sensitive to magnetic fields in vitro, but some researchers dispute the authors’ assertion that the findings could help explain avian magnetoreception.
African Coelacanths May Live to Be 100: Study
African Coelacanths May Live to Be 100: Study
Catherine Offord | Jun 18, 2021
This evolutionarily ancient fish species has a lifespan that’s around five times longer than previously thought, and a gestation time of more than five years.
WITH VIDEO
Chimp Groups Have Their Own Distinct “Handshakes”
Chimp Groups Have Their Own Distinct “Handshakes”
Robin Donovan | Jun 18, 2021
A 12-year study shows variation among primate groups in how the animals clasp hands during grooming, but consistency within them, even as group membership shifts over time.
Aquarium Jellyfish Turns Out to Be Undescribed Species
Aquarium Jellyfish Turns Out to Be Undescribed Species
Lisa Winter | Jun 18, 2021
The newly characterized “elegant jellyfish,” roughly the size of a human hand, had been on display in two aquariums in Japan for more than a decade.
Firefly Tourism Sparks Calls for Sustainable Practices
Firefly Tourism Sparks Calls for Sustainable Practices
Asher Jones | Jun 1, 2021
More and more people are traveling around the world to watch the luminous displays of fireflies, but tourism-related light pollution and habitat degradation threaten to snuff out the insects at some locations.  
Few Car Crashes with Deer in Wisconsin, Perhaps Thanks to Wolves
Few Car Crashes with Deer in Wisconsin, Perhaps Thanks to Wolves
Jef Akst | May 25, 2021
In areas where gray wolf populations have grown, motorists have fewer collisions with deer, likely due to the predators keeping deer away from roadways.
Dogs: The New COVID-19 Rapid Test
Dogs: The New COVID-19 Rapid Test
Kerry Grens | May 24, 2021
Two studies this month point to pooches’ quick detection of SARS-CoV-2 on material that touched the skin of infected participants, although the pups’ accuracy does not match that of RT-PCR.
Salamander Expert David Wake Dies at 84
Salamander Expert David Wake Dies at 84
Lisa Winter | May 21, 2021
Throughout his career, the University of California, Berkeley, herpetologist named 144 species of salamanders.
When Severed, This Solitary Tunicate Regrows as Three New Animals
When Severed, This Solitary Tunicate Regrows as Three New Animals
Amanda Heidt | May 13, 2021
While regeneration has long been the domain of colonial tunicates, a solitary species of sea squirt was able to regenerate into multiple, fully functional individuals within a month of being cut up.