Breaking Up Isn't Hard To Do: A cacophony of sonicators, cell bombs, and grinders

Date: November 9, 1998Comparison of Disruptors With names such as cell crushers, grinders, disintegrators, and pulverizers dominating the field, the business of cell disruption is not for the faint of heart. Some of the functions of these machines are so twisted and diabolical that they would make the Marquis de Sade wince. These devices do the dirty work of the research world, ripping and tearing at the fabric of plants and animal tissues with extreme prejudice to both forms of life. Many scie

Brent Johnson
Nov 8, 1998

Date: November 9, 1998Comparison of Disruptors

With names such as cell crushers, grinders, disintegrators, and pulverizers dominating the field, the business of cell disruption is not for the faint of heart. Some of the functions of these machines are so twisted and diabolical that they would make the Marquis de Sade wince. These devices do the dirty work of the research world, ripping and tearing at the fabric of plants and animal tissues with extreme prejudice to both forms of life. Many scientists turn a blind eye to this unsavory business, leaving such duties to grad students. Behind the secrecy of closed doors, this little-acknowledged aspect of research has gone without comment until now. Finally, these machines and their creators will be revealed.

There are primarily five methods for disrupting and homogenizing cell tissue. The most familiar is the common vertical blender that typically resides in most household kitchens....

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